Strategy Quiz - Miss M's English Blog

Strategy Quiz - Miss M's English Blog

Strategy Quiz HIGHER CLOSE READING Lines 17 The internet search engine Google, with whom I spend more time than with my loved ones, is planning to put the contents of the worlds greatest university libraries online, including the Bodleian in Oxford and those of Harvard and Stanford in America. Part of me is ecstatic at the thought of all that information at my fingertips; another part of me is nostalgic,

because I think physical libraries, booklined and cathedral-quiet, are a cherished part of civilisation we lose at our cultural peril. 2007 1. Read lines 17. (a) What two contrasting emotions does the writer have about the plan to put the great university libraries online? Use your own words in your answer. 2 U

Question type? Strategy - Understanding questions Make a point to get a point. Bullet point your answers. Use your own words at all times. Not sure? Offer another possibility. Lines 17 The internet search engine Google, with whom I spend more time than with my loved ones, is

planning to put the contents of the worlds greatest university libraries online, including the Bodleian in Oxford and those of Harvard and Stanford in America. Part of me is ecstatic at the thought of all that information at my fingertips; another part of me is nostalgic, because I think physical libraries, booklined and cathedral-quiet, are a cherished part of civilisation we lose at our cultural peril. Marking Instructions Acceptable gloss on ecstatic (1) eg

joyous, thrilled, excited, delighted ; happy by itself is not acceptable there must be some idea of intensity Acceptable gloss on nostalgic (1) eg looking back fondly, wistful, regretful, reflective, sad/unhappy by itself not acceptable there must be some idea of something connected with past OR the idea that he is apprehensive, fearful (at possible loss/demise of libraries) (1) Lines 1524 At university, I discovered the wonder of the library as a

physical space. Glasgow University has a skyscraper library, built around a vast atrium stretching up through the various floors. Each floor was devoted to a different subject classification. Working away on the economics floor, I could see other students above or belowchatting, flirting, doodling, panickingall cocooned in their own separate worlds of knowledge. Intrigued, I soon took to exploring what was on these other planets: science, architecture, even a whole floor of novels. The unique aspect of a physical library is that you can discover knowledge by accident. There are things you know you dont know, but there are also things you never imagined you did not know.

3. Show how the writer uses imagery and word choice in lines 1524 to convey the wonder of the library as a physical space. 4 A Question type? Strategy Imagery questions Identify the example of imagery Identify what type of imagery What are the qualities of the thing it being

compared to? Apply this meaning to the object/person/idea etc. being described Show how the image is effective (in relation to the question) Strategy Imagery questions (2) What is being compared to what? In what respects are the two similar? How does the comparison help you visualise the subject better? (From Higher English Language Skills book)

Strategy Word choice questions Identify word Meaning Connotation Impact Lines 1524 At university, I discovered the wonder of the library as a physical space. Glasgow University has a skyscraper library, built around a vast atrium stretching up through the various floors. Each floor was devoted to a different subject

classification. Working away on the economics floor, I could see other students above or belowchatting, flirting, doodling, panickingall cocooned in their own separate worlds of knowledge. Intrigued, I soon took to exploring what was on these other planets: science, architecture, even a whole floor of novels. The unique aspect of a physical library is that you can discover knowledge by accident. There are things you know you dont know, but there are also things you never imagined you did not know. Marking Instructions Marks will depend on the quality of comment. An

insightful comment on one technique could score up to 3 marks; alternatively, a candidate could make more basic comments for up to 1 mark each. For full marks there should be comment on both imagery and word choice, but markers should be sympathetic to areas of overlap. Answers on imagery must deconstruct the image, i.e. show an understanding of the literal root of the image and then explore how the writer is extending it figuratively. Answers on word choice must deal with the connotative areas of the words chosen, exploring why the choice of word is effective. Reference alone: 0. Mere identification of an image: 0.

Possible answers: Imagery 1 stretching gives the impression of something being pulled or elongated with connotations of never-ending, upward movement, aspiring 2 cocooned as larvae are protected and self-contained in their cocoons, so each floor in the library is separate and shelters the students within their specialised knowledge areas 3 worlds of knowledge the number of floors is so great and they are so separate that they are like different, independent planetary systems, each specialising in a particular area of knowledge

4 planets the separation into large, distinct learning areas, each self-contained like the isolation and individualism of each planet in space Word choice: 5 wonder connotations of awe, freshness, childlike amazement, admiration 6 skyscraper (library) slightly exaggerated description suggests size and magnificence (be sympathetic to candidates who choose to see skyscraper as an image) 7 vast gives the impression of an enormous

extent of space 8 atrium idea of large, impressive central area with connotations of classical ideas/learning Lines 47 54 Libraries have another function still, which the internet cannot fulfil. Libraries, like museums, are custodians of knowledgeand should be funded as such. It has become the fashion in recent decades to turn our great national libraries and museums into entertainment centres, with audio-visuals, interactive displays and gimmicks. While I have

some enthusiasm for popularising esoteric knowledge, it cannot always be reduced to the level of a childs view of the universe. We have a duty to future generations to invest in the custodians of our culture, in particular its literature and manuscripts. 6. Read lines 4754. (a) Twice in this paragraph the writer refers to libraries as custodians. What does this word mean? 1 U

Question type? Strategy Context questions DEFINITION: give a definition of the unfamiliar word, as best you can QUOTE: refer to the context & pick out (quote) words which mean something similar to your definition of the word SHOW: Show how the quote(s) helped you to arrive at the meaning of this unfamiliar word. Lines 47 54

Libraries have another function still, which the internet cannot fulfil. Libraries, like museums, are custodians of knowledgeand should be funded as such. It has become the fashion in recent decades to turn our great national libraries and museums into entertainment centres, with audio-visuals, interactive displays and gimmicks. While I have some enthusiasm for popularising esoteric knowledge, it cannot always be reduced to the level of a childs view of the universe. We have a duty to future generations to invest in the custodians of our culture, in particular its literature and manuscripts.

Marking Instructions Any acceptable gloss, e.g. guardians, protectors, those who keep something safe, Lines 21 29 It might be thoughtindeed, it is widely assumedthat it must be good for the countryside to be returned to the central position it enjoyed in British life long ago. Yet there is a particularly worrying aspect of the new rural mania that suggests it might finally do the countryside

more harm than good. This is the identification, in the current clamour, of the countryside in general and the landscape in particular with the pastthe insistence on the part of those who claim to have the best intentions of ruralism at heart that their aim is to protect what they glibly refer to as our heritage. This wildly overused term is seriously misleading, not least because nobody appears ever to have asked what it means. 2008 3. Read lines 2129. (a) By referring to specific words or phrases,

show how lines 2124 perform a linking function at this stage in the writers argument. 2 U Question type? Strategy Linking questions Quote Link back Quote Link forward Remember to refer to the linking word if there

is one Lines 21 29 It might be thoughtindeed, it is widely assumedthat it must be good for the countryside to be returned to the central position it enjoyed in British life long ago. Yet there is a particularly worrying aspect of the new rural mania that suggests it might finally do the countryside more harm than good. This is the identification, in the current clamour, of the countryside in general and the landscape in particular with the pastthe insistence on the part of those who claim to have the best intentions

of ruralism at heart that their aim is to protect what they glibly refer to as our heritage. This wildly overused term is seriously misleading, not least because nobody appears ever to have asked what it means. Marking Instructions For full marks answers must refer to specific words or phrases and explain the precise nature of the link to what precedes or follows. Two elements are required, e.g.: 1 returned to the central position refers to the aim of the action groups mentioned in lines 15-20 (no credit for the quotation unless the reference

back is identified) 2 worrying aspect points forward to concerns the writer has (no credit for the quotation unless the reference forward is identified) How did you do? Questio n number Questio n type

Points availabl e 2007 1a U 2 2007 3 A

4 2007 6 U 1 2008 3a U

2 Mark achieved Comment Strategy revision Strategy Understanding questions (1a) Imagery questions (3) Word choice questions (3) Context / meaning of words (6)

Linking questions (3a) Need to revise? Close Reading USING FORMULAS 2009 Lines 13-19 Speaker after speaker bemoaned how the public had somehow misunderstood the aviation industry and had come to believe that aviation is a huge and

disproportionate polluter. Lets get this in perspective, said repeated speakers: this is small fry compared with cars, factories, even homes. Why are we being singled out, they cried? Why not, they said, chase after other industries that could easily make efficiency savings instead of picking on an industry that gives so much to the world, yet is currently so economically fragile? 9 (b) Show how the writers use of language in lines 1319 conveys his unsympathetic view of the speakers at the conference. In your answer you should refer to at least two

features such as sentence structure, tone, word choice . . . 4 A Question type? Sentence Structure: You may be asked to comment on: Punctuation Sentence length Sentence types Sentence patterns You will never be given marks for simply identifying

a feature (e.g. the writer uses semi-colons). You must always say what effect or purpose it has. SENTENCE TYPES Statement The capital of Scotland is Edinburgh. Command Stand up. Get your things. Stand outside. Move!

Question Are you feeling under the weather? Rhetorical Question Do I look like I was born yesterday? Exclamation What

a fantastic present! How cool! I love it! Minor Sentence (sentences without a verb) aka note-form What time? Three oclock. Where? At the station. Happy days. SENTENCE PATTERNS Repetition To emphasise the word/phrase being repeated. I have the same problem year after year after year after year. (This emphasises that things never change from one year to the next. The

problem has gone on for ever.) List To emphasise the quantity, volume or variety of something. She loved most subjects at school: English, Maths, French, Biology, PE, Art, Music, Drama Climax To show a progression or sequence. To build up to a dramatic or important finish. Susans behaviour annoyed her friends, angered her teachers, and utterly enraged her father.

PUNCTUATION Comma , Used to break up clauses/phrases in a sentence. Several commas can be used to create a simple list. At the shops I bought eggs, milk, soup, bread and cheese. Exclamation mark ! Shows emotions such as surprise, excitement, enthusiasm, anger or shock.

I cant believe Ive won! Ive won! Im a millionaire! Question mark ? Indicates a question. Rhetorical Questions dont require an answer because it is already known or not needed. Questions are often used to involve the reader or grab their attention. Are you tired? Are you stressed? Do you wish you could just forget about your daily troubles? Then why not come to the Clarkston Spa Resort?

Ellipsis To show a sentence trailing off. To show a sentence being interrupted. To show pauses or uncertainty. To show words have been missed out. She was worried. I justI mean it was right therecant believeI cant have l Colon

: Introduces a list, quotation or example. My favourite books: Jane Eyre, Perfume, Mrs Dalloway, Twilight and War and Peace. Semi-colon ; Separates items in a complex list (where each item is several words long) The company has shops in London which is in the UK; Seville which is in the south of Spain; Houston which is the capital of Texas in America, and Rome the capital of Italy. Dash

Introduces extra information, an elaboration, an explanation or an example. The most terrifying dinosaur was the Tyrannosaurus Rex a massive, carnivorous and aggressive beast. Two Dashes or Two Brackets ( ) Called parenthesis. Used to insert one of two kinds of extra information: an explanation or more detail. A comment or aside from the writer (often humourous). The age in which the T-Rex lived (the Jurassic Period) was

about 200 million years ago. My sister had only come into my room (rude enough in itself) to ask if she could borrow my jeans (as if!). Formula Sentence structure Identify the feature of structure being used. Comment on the effect of the structure on the readers understanding of the passage. Underline any examples of sentence structure Speaker after speaker bemoaned how the public

had somehow misunderstood the aviation industry and had come to believe that aviation is a huge and disproportionate polluter. Lets get this in perspective, said repeated speakers: this is small fry compared with cars, factories, even homes. Why are we being singled out, they cried? Why not, they said, chase after other industries that could easily make efficiency savings instead of picking on an industry that gives so much to the world, yet is currently so economically fragile? Repetition, colon, questions

Speaker after speaker bemoaned how the public had somehow misunderstood the aviation industry and had come to believe that aviation is a huge and disproportionate polluter. Lets get this in perspective, said repeated speakers: this is small fry compared with cars, factories, even homes. Why are we being singled out, they cried? Why not, they said, chase after other industries that could easily make efficiency savings instead of picking on an industry that gives so much to the world, yet is currently so economically fragile?

Tone Bank Informal; Humorous; Light Hearted; Whimsical; Gently Mocking Sarcastic; Mocking; Ironic Formal; Questioning; Outraged; Angry; Critical; Sinister Nostalgic; Reverential; Reflective; Awed Disappointed; Uncertain; Doubtful Formula Tone Identify the tone.

Quote words or phrases that create this tone Analyse how those words/phrases create the tone. Underline any examples of tone Speaker after speaker bemoaned how the public had somehow misunderstood the aviation industry and had come to believe that aviation is a huge and disproportionate polluter. Lets get this in perspective, said repeated speakers: this is small fry compared with cars, factories, even homes.

Why are we being singled out, they cried? Why not, they said, chase after other industries that could easily make efficiency savings instead of picking on an industry that gives so much to the world, yet is currently so economically fragile? Mocking, satirical, pejorative, belittling Speaker after speaker bemoaned how the public had somehow misunderstood the aviation industry and had come to believe that aviation is a huge and disproportionate polluter. Lets get this in perspective, said repeated speakers: this is small

fry compared with cars, factories, even homes. Why are we being singled out, they cried? Why not, they said, chase after other industries that could easily make efficiency savings instead of picking on an industry that gives so much to the world, yet is currently so economically fragile? Word choice Word choice refers to specific words chosen by the writer in preference to another. The words usually reflect the writers

attitude about the topic. (Do not confuse with imagery which involves a comparison and is not literally true.) Formula Word choice Quote the word and give its basic meaning Give the words connotations (associated ideas)

Explain how the words connotations develop the readers understanding of the passage Underline any examples of word choice Speaker after speaker bemoaned how the public had somehow misunderstood the aviation industry and had come to believe that aviation is a huge and disproportionate polluter. Lets get this in perspective, said repeated speakers: this is small fry compared with cars, factories, even homes. Why are we being singled out, they cried? Why

not, they said, chase after other industries that could easily make efficiency savings instead of picking on an industry that gives so much to the world, yet is currently so economically fragile? Speaker after speaker bemoaned how the public had somehow misunderstood the aviation industry and had come to believe that aviation is a huge and disproportionate polluter. Lets get this in perspective, said repeated speakers: this is small fry compared with cars, factories, even homes. Why are we being singled out, they cried? Why

not, they said, chase after other industries that could easily make efficiency savings instead of picking on an industry that gives so much to the world, yet is currently so economically fragile? Marking Instructions Marks will depend on the quality of comment. An insightful comment on one feature could score up to 3 marks; alternatively a candidate could make more basic comments for up to 1 mark each. For full marks, there must be comment on at least two features.

Mere identification of a feature of sentence structure: 0. Reference alone: 0. Possible answers: Sentence structure: 1 repetition (speaker after speaker) to emphasise the sheer number of delegates of like mind, claiming victimisation of the industry 2 use of colon to introduce so-called justification for their case by singling out what they claim are even greater causes of pollution

3 use of questions in the final two sentences designed to divert attention from their culpability Word choice 4 bemoaned, cried use of negative language to emphasise the self-pitying, whingeing nature of the delegates 5 somehow suggests it has happened by chance/not based on logic 6 in perspective assumed rationality followed by obfuscation 7 singled out, chase after, picking on presenting

themselves as harassed victims 8 efficiency savings delegates euphemism to disguise effects on other industries 9 gives so much to the world sanctimonious self-justification 10 economically fragile supposed claims of being delicate, vulnerable, frail, Tone 11 mocking, satirical, pejorative, belittling supported by sensible comment such as: - the use of reported speech (eg Why singled out?)

to replicate sound of whingeing complaints - presentation of themselves as victimised underdogs - colloquial language (small fry, singled out, chase after, picking on) to present delegates as juvenile, shallow - they cried they said creates sense of constant complaint - or appropriate comment using any of points 1-10 above Lines 20-24 But even in this self-interested arena a representative from the US Federal Aviation

Administration caused some sharp intakes of breath from the audience by showing an extraordinary map of current flightpaths etched over one another on the worlds surface. The only places on Earth that are not scarred by routes are blocks of air space over the central Pacific, the southern Atlantic and Antarctica. 9 (c) How effective do you find the writers use of imagery in lines 2024 in conveying the impact that flying has on the

environment? 2 A/E Question type? Imagery Similes Metaphors Personification Involves a comparison Is not meant to be taken literally Formula - Imagery Identify the type of image

Quote it Say what is compared to what Use just as... so too Say what the comparison adds to the readers understanding of the passage. Formula - Evaluation Identify an appropriate feature or technique. Show how it relates to the writers purpose, attitude or overall line of argument.

Identify any imagery But even in this self-interested arena a representative from the US Federal Aviation Administration caused some sharp intakes of breath from the audience by showing an extraordinary map of current flightpaths etched over one another on the worlds surface. The only places on Earth that are not scarred by routes are blocks of air space over the central Pacific, the southern Atlantic and Antarctica.

Metaphors But even in this self-interested arena a representative from the US Federal Aviation Administration caused some sharp intakes of breath from the audience by showing an extraordinary map of current flightpaths etched over one another on the worlds surface. The only places on Earth that are not scarred by routes are blocks of air space over the central Pacific, the southern Atlantic and Antarctica.

Marking instructions Marks will depend on the quality of the comment. An insightful comment could score up to 2 marks; a weaker comment will be worth up to 1 mark. Mere identification of an image: 0. Answers on imagery must deconstruct the image, i.e. show an understanding of the literal root of the image and then explore how the writer is extending it figuratively in his line of thought.

Possible answers/comments: 1 etched (over one another) just as etching involves cutting into a surface, using acid or a sharp implement, so the Earth will be permanently damaged by a crisscrossing indentation of flightpaths 2 scarred just as a scar is a mark left by a wound, there will be permanent disfigurement to the Earth Lines 35-39

A remedy such as carbon-neutralising our flights is a nice, cuddly idea that on the surface is a positive action to take, but planting trees in Thailand or handing out ecolightbulbs in Honduras is no substitute for getting planes out of the skies. It also carries the risk that people will think job done and simply carry on flying regardless. 11. Show how the writer, in lines 3539, creates a dismissive tone when discussing possible remedies.

2 A Question type? Tone Bank Informal; Humorous; Light Hearted; Whimsical; Gently Mocking Sarcastic; Mocking; Ironic Formal; Questioning; Outraged; Angry; Critical; Sinister Nostalgic; Reverential; Reflective; Awed Disappointed; Uncertain; Doubtful

Formula Tone Identify the tone. Quote words or phrases that create this tone Analyse how those words/phrases create the tone. Marking instructions Marks will depend on the quality of explanation. A single point well explained and supported by suitable reference could

score up to 2 marks. A more basic comment will score 1 mark. Reference alone or mere identification of feature: 0. Identify example of tone A remedy such as carbon-neutralising our flights is a nice, cuddly idea that on the surface is a positive action to take, but planting trees in Thailand or handing out ecolightbulbs in Honduras is no substitute for getting planes out of the skies. It also carries the risk that people will think job done and

simply carry on flying regardless. A remedy such as carbon-neutralising our flights is a nice, cuddly idea that on the surface is a positive action to take, but planting trees in Thailand or handing out ecolightbulbs in Honduras is no substitute for getting planes out of the skies. It also carries the risk that people will think job done and simply carry on flying / regardless. Possible answers: 1 nice cuddly idea suggests something

childish, spuriously comforting and/or use of colloquial language is incongruous when juxtaposed with scientific terminology beforehand 2 on the surface suggests superficial thinking 3 references to Thailand and Honduras selection of worthy activities/distant locations to convey relatively low-impact options 4 handing out suggests a mere distribution exercise, an easy option, something rather patronising

5 job done flippancy of short-term fix idea 6 (simply) carry on flying clichd, complacent attitude of those indifferent to looking for remedies 7 regardless the last word in passage highlights irresponsibility

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