Induction Survey 2016 Research Report Ben Cooper Research

Induction Survey 2016 Research Report Ben Cooper  Research

Induction Survey 2016 Research Report Ben Cooper Research Manager December 2016 Executive summary The Induction Survey is an annual survey which provides The Union and the University with insight into new students experiences and perceptions throughout their start to university at Manchester Met. Topics covered in the 2016 survey include the following: Motivations for university study and choosing Manchester Met Challenges faced during the first weeks of university Perceptions of academic / university induction Perceptions of welcome and wider support through this period The survey was conducted online during the last two weeks of October and 1,646 valid responses were received from participants. Findings illustrate that while, positively, perceptions of the academic timetable have improved for the second year in a row, there remains work to be done to improve the consistency and early availability of timetables, particularly in order to support the experiences of students with significant other commitments who need to plan university study around these. Ratings in relation to the academic induction remained relatively consistent with those seen in 2015. Over eight in ten participants claimed to be satisfied overall and results were similarly high for many of the specific aspects tested. However, they illustrate the need to further improve some students experiences of access and familiarisation to Moodle, IT and Library services and suggest further consideration of arrangements for collecting ID, and introduction to the course rep system. Beyond the academic induction, satisfaction with the welcome period has fallen from last year and results indicate there is definite scope for The Union and University to improve perceptions of events and support available to new students in this period. A large part of this may be about improving provision for non-Traditional cohorts within the diverse Manchester Met student population. However, an additional challenge will be to ensure that all student types are aware of the range of opportunities, services and activities available to support them through this period and that these are perceived as relevant to them and their needs. 1.) Background, methodology and participant profile Contents 2.) Motivations for study and choosing Manchester Met 3.) Initial challenges when starting university and retention 4.) Timetable and academic induction 5.) Welcome period support and events 6.) Appendix: Motivations and challenges by student type 2014 - 2016 Background, methodology and participant profile Background The Induction Survey has been conducted annually by the Students Union for a number of years. The survey provides The Union and the University with insight into new students experiences and perceptions of the induction period at Manchester Met. Topics covered in the survey include the following: Motivations for university study and choosing Manchester Met Challenges faced during the first weeks of university Perceptions of academic / university induction Perceptions of the welcome period and wider support throughout Knowledge, engagement and satisfaction with The Union The questionnaire was refreshed in 2014 to concentrate on participants perceptions of starting at Manchester Met and initial impressions of The Union (as opposed to experiences throughout the first term). A focus for the 2016 questionnaire was to explore attitudes to night-time entertainment and The Unions events during the welcome period. This report presents analysis of the findings, including differences by demographics where notable, and suggests some implications for improving the welcome experience. Each section composes a summary commentary of the findings followed by charts and tables which display the data gathered. For further information, please contact [email protected] Methodology Survey responses were collected through an online quantitative survey which was in field from 17 th 30th October. All registered first year students (including postgraduate and part-time students) were emailed inviting them to take part in an online survey exploring their experience of starting at Manchester Met. The survey was also made available through the My MMU App to maximise response. Participation was incentivised with entry into a prize draw to win 250 cash and 1,874 responses were received an initial response rate of 13%. Data analysis was conducted on 1,646 responses after data cleaning. In some analyses data has been weighted to provide a better representative of results within the actual University population. In such cases, data is noted as weighted in charts and is done so by study mode/ level, age, gender and ethnicity. Data for specific cohorts of students e.g. Postgraduate or Traditional is not weighted. Participant profile Throughout this report, reference is made to Traditional, Traditional-commuter PPM and International students. These terms define broad student types as follows: Traditional

Aged 18 25 UK, Full-time, Undergraduate Live in shared student accommodation e.g. halls / flats Traditional-commuter As above but do not live in shared student accommodation Live with family, relatives, on their own and commute to MMU to study PPM Aged 26+, or Postgraduate, or Study part-time International EU or overseas Note: - Unless otherwise stated, international students are counted as International and not PPM in analyses. - Prior to 2016, mature students were classified as aged 25+ and Traditional aged 18 24. Participant profile The chart below shows the number of students who completed the survey split by student type and key demographic groups. There are gains in participant numbers across all cohorts except at the Cheshire site and the participant profile is not dissimilar to that of 2015. 1600 1558 201 6 1500 1397 1400 1366 1399 1286 1300 1169 1159 1138 1200 1110 1100 1018 1000 900 800 700 600 647 598 577 549 524 482 500 400 300 200 100 0 327 326 315 285 266 245 90103 2630

7366 235 210 Participant profile The charts below show the demographic profile of students who participated in the survey compared to that for all Manchester Met first years. 65 56 18 32 40 18 11 22 All MMU 1st Year Induction Survey 7 9 26 67 Fe 9 30 0 40 60 80 % students 100 85 89 UK EU 0 20 40 60 % students Traditio... 5 6 Mixed 3 4 Other 3 4 Unknown 1 2 100 0 20 Clearing 40 60 % students

80 100 100 8 26 Internati... 20 40 60 80 % students 10 Carer 5 5 0 Black 20 PPM O' 80 38 Traditional Commu... 9 6 14 14 Asian 59 16 20 73 70 White Have a disability 15 0 20 40 % students 60 Base: 1,647 2016 Induction Survey 14,624 All Manchester Met (source MSL current enrolled students accessed 1st November 2016) 10 0 10 20 30 40 % students 50 Participant profile The charts below show the profile of first year students who participated in the survey compared to that for Manchester Met first year by study mode / level and faculty. 73 Full-time Undergraduate 27 30 Arts & Humanities 2

Part-time Undergraduate 22 Bus & Law 61 24 7 Induction Survey 21 Full-time Postgraduate 13 HPSC All MMU 1st Year 16 17 Science & Engineering 14 18 12 Education 14 5 Part-time Postgraduate 13 0 20 5 Cheshire 40 60 80 100 % students Base: 1,647 2016 Induction Survey 14,624 All Manchester Met (source MSL current enrolled students accessed 1st November 2016) 5 0 5 10 15 20 % students 25 30 35 40 Motivations for study and choosing Manchester Met Section summary Research indicates that across the Manchester Met population, new students' motivations for selecting university study and choosing Manchester Met remained very similar to those seen last year, both in terms of the ranking of factors and the extent to which each were identified as influencing choice. University study continued to be driven primarily by employability and academic interest while location and course content remained most critical to choosing Manchester Met. These findings, observed among all participants, tend to hold true irrespective of student type However, given the notable variations in other motivations for both study and choice of institution by student type it is useful to compare these results at a more granular level.

Here, results from the 2016 Induction Survey again demonstrate the difference in priorities of different student types and emphasise the importance of the social aspect of university in determining choices among Traditional students. They also illustrate the additional importance placed on visit experience, course reputation, accommodation and attraction of Manchester / Crewe among this cohort. The appendix to this report provides some additional data on motivations by student type over time. Reasons for university study and choosing Manchester Met The charts below show all participants responses in relation to reasons for choosing university study in general and Manchester Met in particular. At this macro level, results remained similar to those seen the previous year. Reasons for choosing Manchester Met Reasons for choosing university study To improve job prospects / earning potential Academic challenge / achievement 55 51 Necessary for future employment 53 55 Necessary for current career progression 32 28 Social life at university 31 28 Open / visit day experience Course reputation Suitable entry requirements Good employability prospects Nightlife / social scene Specialisms of academic staff 201 5 Knowing current students Teacher / prof recommend 11 9 Unsure what to do after previous education Ratings on KIS / Unistats Accommodation options 4 4 Friends were all going 0 20 22 25 21 20 18 17 16 14 15 12 11 10 11 Comms from MMU prior to choice 11 11 To gain increased respect Reviews in university guides Friends / family recommend 12 12 Expected of you 42 42

37 40 35 39 39 37 31 33 31 31 27 27 Academic / campus facilities 48 45 Experience in general 56 59 Course content 64 65 A desire to learn / interest in subject 63 62 Location 67 66 40 60 80 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 % participants Base: All participants1,646 / 1,500 2016 6 7 Lack of other options 20 2015 % participants Base: All participants 1,646 / 1,321 Main reason for choosing Manchester Met Overall, participants primary reasons for choosing Manchester Met remained similar to those seen last year with course content, followed by location being most likely to determine choice. Main Reason for Choosing Manchester Met 26 Course content Location 13 8 8 8 8 8 8 Academic / campus facilities Good employability prospects Open / visit day experience Course reputation 7 Suitable entry requirements 7 7 Reviews in university guides Specialisms of academic staff

2 8 3 3 3 3 Things to do in Manchester / Crewe 2 2 2 2 Friends / family recommend Teacher / professional recommend 1 Lack of other options 1 Knowing current students Nightlife / social scene Comms from MMU prior to choice 1 1 1 Ratings on KIS / Unistats 0 Base: All participants1,646 / 1,500 29 14 2015 2016 2 2 2 2 2 10 % participants 20 30 Reasons for university study by student type The table below shows variation in motivations for going to university by student type. As we have seen previously, the general experience and social life were widely cited as important for Traditional students and notably less so PPM students. Total (1,648) Base: In brackets UG FT (1,158) UG PT (26) PG FT (326) PGPT (73) Traditional (598) Internation al (235) PPM (412) Trad Comm (315) To improve your job prospects / earning potential A desire to learn / a deep interest in a particular subject For the academic challenge / achievement It is necessary for the job you want to do in the future

67% 67% 65% 67% 58% 70% 61% 62% 73% 64% 65% 62% 63% 66% 65% 64% 61% 66% 55% 54% 89% 57% 62% 52% 57% 58% 56% 53% 52% 42% 59% 42% 49% 44% 59% 58% The experience in general It is necessary to progress in your current career 48% 54% 42% 33% 23% 65% 48% 26% 42% 32%

27% 35% 42% 44% 23% 32% 40% 36% The social life at university 31% 37% 15% 16% 5% 51% 25% 10% 23% It was expected of you To gain increased respect from others Unsure what to do after school / college / university course 12% 14% 8% 6% 3% 14% 14% 5% 15% 11% 11% 27% 10% 15% 9% 12% 11% 15% 11% 12% 8% 7% 1% 14% 7% 6% 13%

Your friends were all going 4% 5% 4% 3% 1% 7% 3% 2% 4% Red: -20% from total / Green: +20% from total Reasons for Manchester Met study by student type The table below shows variation in motivations for choosing Manchester Met by student type. As we have seen previously, the general experience and social life were among the most common motivations for Traditional students and notably less common among PPM students. Total (1,648) UG PT (26) PG FT (326) PGPT (73) Traditional (598) Internation al (235) PPM (412) Trad Comm (315) Location 63% 67% 50% 56% 40% 64% 52% 56% 76% Course content 56% 55% 58% 60% 52% 59% 49% 57% 56% Academic /campus facilities 42% 42% 54% 41%

43% 43% 42% 38% 43% Open / visit day experience 37% 44% 31% 28% 14% 46% 9% 27% 45% Course reputation 35% 44% 23% 20% 10% 53% 35% 24% 47% Suitable entry requirements 39% 33% 31% 41% 33% 31% 33% 35% 39% Employability prospects 31% 34% 19% 23% 19% 36% 24% 22% 33% University guides 31% 32%

23% 31% 15% 31% 30% 27% 40% Nightlife / social scene 27% 34% 8% 10% 4% 53% 15% 8% 13% Things to do in Man / Crewe 26% 29% 12% 21% 11% 37% 29% 15% 18% Good comms prior to choice 25% 25% 15% 26% 18% 23% 24% 22% 31% Recommend friends / family 20% 22% 8% 14% 10% 22% 15% 12% 28% Specialisms of staff

20% 15% 12% 28% 44% 14% 19% 29% 17% Knowing current students 17% 18% 23% 16% 4% 15% 15% 14% 26% Recommend teacher / prof 14% 13% 15% 14% 15% 10% 20% 14% 13% KIS / Unistats 12% 14% 12% 5% 3% 13% 11% 5% 17% Accommodation options 10% 13% - 4% 1% 22% 8% 2%

1% 6% 6% 4% 6% 10% 6% 8% 5% 4% Lack of alternative Base: In brackets UG FT (1,158) Red: -20% from total / Green: +20% from total Initial challenges when starting university and retention Section summary (1) As with motivations for choosing university study and Manchester Met, the extent to which respondents claimed to find different aspects of starting university challenging remained very similar to that recorded in 2015. A range of challenges were widely reported although initially, students claimed to find getting used to the course structure, workload and academic expectations the most difficult, followed by financial organisation and forming friendships. Positively, the extent to which aspects were identified as remaining challenging a few weeks into the course (at time of survey) were much diminished. However, one in ten still reported struggling with friendships, academic expectations and understanding how the course worked and one in six found adjusting to the workload, understanding finances, finding work or juggling studies with other commitment difficult. Again, results here are most usefully considered by student type given how different backgrounds and study patterns impact strongly on the particular challenges faced by students. As we have seen before in previous waves of the survey, results reveal how Traditional students can find social aspects of university together with independent living more challenging and may value extra support with understanding financial matters and finding employment. Findings also indicate how Traditional-commuter students are more likely to identify difficulties with getting to grips with the course as well as making friends and finding their way around and getting help. Given the high proportion of Manchester Met students who comprise this group (estimated around 25%) and heightened difficulties they face, it may be useful to consider placing additional emphasis on supporting this cohort in relation to their wider challenges through their first weeks. Given the life stages of many PPM students, it is perhaps unsurprising that they identify balancing studies and other commitments as a challenge more widely than other cohorts. However, they also identify difficulties in getting used to the learning resources, possibly due to fewer opportunities to use them, lack of familiarity and, in some cases, assumptions that they will have prior knowledge of them. This is something that is highlighted in connection with the academic induction and perhaps deserves further consideration. Section summary (2) Results around retention, transfer and deferral are positive in the sense that the proportion of participants considering each remains relatively low and, compared to 2105, a slight decrease in the proportion of students considering leaving university altogether over the first few weeks was observed. However, results also indicate a slight increase in consideration of transferring course or university something that also holds for full-time undergraduate students. Comments from students indicate some interesting points in connection with this finding. Some of those who reported considering changing course had done so already and many of these specifically mentioned being happier with their new course. Similar to findings observed last year, thoughts about changing course tended to prompted by change of interest in subject, where students did not enjoy their course or found it different to what they expected. Where students claimed to have considered leaving Manchester Met, issues around loneliness, being homesick, financial difficulties, work being challenging and not enjoying the course were among the most common reasons mentioned. The myriad of reasons cited for consideration of leaving highlights the range of challenges that can present to students in their first weeks and also demonstrates how it is equally those associated with the social aspects of university life, levels of preparedness and conviction in their choice, and external pressures around family, health and finances that can lead students to question their choice as much as concerns about the course. Where such course based concerns are raised, comments indicate that perceptions of poor organisation and administration can prompt consideration of leaving, as well as doubts about course content. A number also expressed a desire to transfer to a better or higher tariff university, and several such students suggested a planned strategy to do so if they did well initially on their course at Manchester Met. Drop out will perhaps be highest among students who struggle academically as well as socially and with other aspects of life, but findings here suggest retention in the longer term could be an issue for better performing students too. This may be an area to consider further if government strategy seeks to make it easier for students to change provider as part of championing student choice. Initial challenges starting at Manchester Met Overall, the most frequently mentioned challenge for students beginning at Manchester Met was understanding how the course worked / was structured although a range of issues were widely identified. While challenges tended to be met over the first weeks, those related to finances, other commitments and workload remained particularly visible thereafter. Initial and persisting challenges faced at Manchester Met Understanding how your course is structured / works 35 10 Adapting to volume / difficulty of work and new styles of learning Understanding what was expected of you academically 31 11 Understanding and organising your finances 30

14 Making friends and developing a social network 26 16 Getting used to using the different learning resources 26 8 Integrating with other students in lectures and seminars 24 7 Finding part-time employment to fit around studies 23 15 Finding your way around university campus 21 3 Knowing who / where to go for help when you needed it 20 7 Feeling lonely and / or homesick 19 8 Living independently away from home 16 4 Getting involved in activities like clubs, societies or volunteering 16 7 Settling into life in Manchester / Crewe 2 Getting settled into your accommodation 2 Living with other students 14 14 4 0 Remain challenging Initially challenging 10 2 Your course not being what you expected it to be No notable change in prevalence of both initial and persisting challenges from 2015. See appendix for further detail 29 10 Juggling studies with other commitments

Base: 1,646 32 16 5 10 10 15 20 25 30 % participants 35 40 45 50 Initial challenges starting at Manchester Met Variation in the likelihood to report challenges were noted by student type. Where particular groups were more likely to report challenges, these are highlighted below with the proportion identifying initial / remaining challenges shown in brackets. Traditional-commuter students were more likely to report adapting to both the academic and social side of university. Traditional-commuter Traditional International Navigating around campus (29% / 3%) Living independently (31% / 8%) Feeling lonely / homesick (25% / 11%) Making friends (39% / 15%) Understanding what expected academically (35% / 13%) Living with other students (21% / 5%) Integrating to life in Manchester / Crewe (22% / 2%) Understanding what expected academically (35% / 13%) Settling into life in Manchester Crewe (23% / 3%) Adapting to work and learning (38% / 22%)

Integrating with others in lectures /seminars (31% / 9%) Getting used to learning resources (31% / 11%) Getting involved in Clubs, Societies and Volunteering (21% / 11%) Understanding course structure (41% / 11%) Knowing where to go for help (25% / 8%) Finding part-time employment (31% / 21%) Understanding and organising finances (40% / 20%) PPM Getting settled into accommodation (25% / 3%) Getting used to learning resources (28% / 10%) Feeling lonely / homesick (29% / 12%) Juggling studies and other commitments (45% / 32%) Retention, transfer and deferral The proportions of participants who claimed to have considered leaving the University or their course in 2016 were similar to those recorded in 2015. However, while the proportion claiming to have considered leaving university altogether fell slightly, consideration of transferring away from Manchester Met increased slightly. Consideration of deferring, transferring and leaving since starting 6 7 11 2013-12 9 1 Transferring course 2014-15 3 Transfering to another university 2015-16 5 2016-17 6 6 Base: 1,646 2015-16 7 2 0 5 10 % participants 7

6 7 13 5 4 6 14 14 0 5 10 15 Due to the change in timing of the survey for 2014, results prior to this wave are not strictly comparable with previous years 20 3 2015-16 2016-17 5 8 Transferring cou... 8 8 Transfering to another univer... 5 0 Base: 1,158 2015-16 2014-15 3 Deferring studies and coming back nex... % participants Base: 1,646 2015-16 20 5 Leaving university altoge... 15 Transfering to another university 15 UG FT only 6 Transferring course within Manchester Met 2 2013-14 4 4 Deferring studies and coming back next year Leaving university altogether Deferring studies and coming back next ... 6 Leaving university altogether

Consideration at time of survey 6 6 5 10 15 % participants 20 Reasons for considering transferring 75 participants who claimed to have considered transferring their course but not leaving Manchester Met or study altogether made comments explaining their reasons for doing so. A summary of their responses is shown below. Course not enjoyable / not right (13 comments) Not enjoying my course, wish I'd have chosen something different. Was unsure whether it was the course for me. Concerns about career (6 comments) I worried that I was heading down one singular path which closed all of my options. I don't know where I want to be in the future and I felt this course pushed me in a certain direction and I wasn't sure if I wanted that. I was unsure on the best options for my future career. Base: 75 comments numbers in brackets Change of interest (28 comments) I transferred courses as the original course was no longer what I wanted to do. Course too challenging (4 comments) I have no scientific background and found the subject a bit challenging. Difficulty of work and the course. Ive considered changing my course from biology to ecology and conservation because its areas Im more interested in. The course I am on is a foundation course but I do not want to continue onto the full course. I am interested in going into Speech and Language Therapy not Psychology. Course not as expected (5 comments) The course is not what I expected but it is too late to change 7 mentioned had already transferred I transferred from biology to chemistry after doing a foundation year in biology because I performed better in chemistry in the exams and in general. I have transferred courses already within MMU as I felt that my new course was more suited to my future career plans. I transferred the first week to Fashion Buying and Merchandising and I am really enjoying it! Reasons for considering leaving and deferring 177 participants who claimed to have considered leaving university or deferring until next year made comments explaining their reasons for doing so. A summary of the most common reasons is shown below. Both course related and wider issues were mentioned. Homesick (19 comments) Course not as expected (16 comments) Prefer higher tariff university (13 comments) Not enjoying course / not sure if right (11 comments) In the first couple of weeks, I hesitated whether I should've chosen a University closer to home, as I was really homesick.

The course is different to what I expected and quite disorganized and altogether the experience is very overwhelming. Don't feel like this is the right university for me, ended up here through my insurance choice. I started to think this course wasn't right for me because I found it rather unorganised, which frustrated me. Such a big adjustment from being surrounded by all your friends/family at home. The course is not what I expected, I don't find it very well structured and there is not much information on assignments so I feel I would enjoy a different course better. Going to Liverpool university which was my first choice or going to Manchester university The course content is poor plus a 2 week induction session which did not give any useful information and now it feels rushed, unorganised and poorly structured. Financial difficulties (19 comments) Not fitting in socially (14 comments) Course too challenging (13 comments) Stress / anxiety problems (11 comments) My finances are still yet to be sorted and I have a young child so it has been stressful. I feel as if I have not made any good friends in and out of my course making me feel lonely and like I don't want to be here. I suffer with anxiety and I am struggling with the pressure of my course, I dont think that I will leave but it has crossed my mind when things get too much. Struggle integrating, making friends, engaging in seminars, trouble with mental health. Issues with finance and concerns about not being able to fund my course. I don't feel like it is for me, I come from a poor family and I can't afford it. Base: 177 comments numbers in brackets Because I feel like university is a massive change and I have definitely struggled to adapt to the change in lifestyle. I questioned whether or not Man Met was the right choice for me since I've struggled to fit in with other students. I am finding it difficult to keep up with the amount of work and so I did consider coming back next year. Although I love the university and my flat/flat mates, my anxiety has been rather severe so I have considered going home and studying at the university in my city. Reasons for considering leaving and deferring 177 participants who claimed to have considered leaving university or deferring until next year made comments explaining their reasons for doing so. A summary of some less common reasons mentioned is shown below. The course was not what I expected and I feel the help you get can be very limited than expected.

Lack of support on course (8) Unsure university is right choice (8) Course not challenging (7) Other commitments (7) Feeling overwhelmed (7) Poor support / contact from university departments (7) Finding it hard to juggle part time work/uni work and caring for my children. I missed most of my induction week due to lack of communication during my application. I had no idea I was on the course until the last day of my induction week and had to change my plans last minute for that day so that I could attend. Preference to pursue paid employment (7) Location (6) City environment / too urban (6) Trouble with flat mates (6) Poor course organisation (5) Personal / family problems (5) Lack of preparedness (5) Base: 177 comments numbers in brackets Really struggling to adapt to university life and still deciding whether this is for me Course not entirely what I expected it to be. Struggling to make friends outside of university life. Being away from home. Struggling to handle finances. Overwhelmed. Don't think uni is for me. would rather go straight into work. Because of the environment of Manchester. I find it hard to relax in such a crowded and concrete city. The course is different to what I expected and quite disorganized and altogether the experience is very overwhelming. Having difficulties settling into my accommodation and the loud social atmosphere of Manchester. I am not motivated to work hard at the moment and I am struggling to keep positive and pay attention and part of me feels like the course is below me as I do not feel challenged. I feel like university is a massive change and I have definitely struggled to adapt to the change in lifestyle. I questioned whether or not Man Met was the right choice for me since I've struggled to fit in with other students. I also considered deferring the year because I thought that perhaps I wasn't prepared for such a drastic change as of yet. The fact that I had to pay for two weeks in a hotel as you hadn't the on campus accommodation ready for the start of my course. 7 mentioned a planned decision to leave Manchester Met (particularly for UoM) in the future. Man Met was my insurance choice, I was 1 mark in one of my A Level subjects off getting in to University of Manchester and so considered transferring for the second year if I did well in the first year at Man Met. Even though MMU is a good university, I want to aim for a high grade for my first year. So then I can get transferred to the UOM, because its highly recognised when getting a degree. However if I just scrape a pass, I'm more than happy remaining at MMU. Timetable and academic induction Section summary (1) Results in relation to the timetable and academic induction were generally positive but also indicate a couple of areas that require improvements. Among all participants, satisfaction with all aspects of the timetable increased slightly from those recorded in 2015 and over eight in ten claimed to be satisfied overall. It is particularly positive to see an increase in satisfaction with receiving the timetable in good time as this was highlighted as a particular issue in last years survey. However, it is suggested that this is an area where further improvements should be sought as a priority. Frustration with late receipt of timetables, on occasion well after the course start, as well as timetable changes are particularly visible in respondents' comments about the academic induction. It is important to recognise the profound effect that these issues can have on students who need to plan around and prioritise other commitments in order to make university study a possibility. For

those who work part-time or have caring responsibilities, late and inconsistent timetables hamper their ability to do so and it is perhaps unsurprising that satisfaction ratings for these students are lower. Perhaps of concern is that a number of comment from students indicated that delays to or lack of communication of timetables meant that they missed important induction activities or scheduled classes. This underlines the importance of timetabling for new students in helping deliver a smooth transition to university study at Manchester Met and positive start to the academic experience. Overall satisfaction with the academic induction remain relatively consistent compared to 2015, with over eight in ten participants claiming to be satisfied overall and half of specific aspects tested received a satisfaction rating of over eight in ten. Familiarisation with library and printing, and introduction to the course rep system received ratings of below 75%. These may be areas to focus on improving for next year given their relatively low ratings. From a Union point of view, it is disappointing to see ratings on the latter fall given additional activity around attempting to improve this aspect in 2016/17. Completing enrolment and collecting ID may be another area to consider revising for next year given the notable drop in satisfaction for this aspect compared to 2015. It may be that collection during the Welcome Festival is revised as part of this, particularly given some comments about waiting times received from students when prompted to suggest improvements. A number of students also commented that their cards were not scanned properly as part of this process which led to a delay in enrolment and, for some, receipt of finance and ability to access learning resources. It is unclear to what extent this problem was experienced across the University population but it has clearly had a significant effect on the learning and living experiences of some students effected by it and should be rectified as a priority for next year. Section summary (2) It is encouraging to see gains in satisfaction with access and familiarisation to library / printing and IT / Moodle services recorded in this wave of the survey as this has previously been identified as an area for attention. However, more could be done to improve student experiences in this regard, perhaps particularly for postgraduate students. Comments about Moodle were among the most frequently mentioned improvements to the academic induction and PPM students have, on occasion, indicated that they are unfamiliar with these systems but appear expected to know how they operate. It is also likely that some face an additional barrier to familiarisation in that they may be unable to spend as much time on campus or access peer support to help assimilation. Other frequently mentioned suggestions for improvement centred around improving socialising opportunities, timetables and information on the course which were also familiar themes reported in the 2015 survey. A wide range of issues were cited as suggested areas for improvement which included Better contact with personal tutors, a priority issue for the University that was mentioned in a fair proportion of comments. A desire for a more condensed or concise induction period, mentioned by just under one in twenty participants. Improved communication and support from the University. Dissatisfaction here appeared to relate to a range of support and admin functions and mention of issues was relatively small. However, comments illustrate the frustration that negative experiences can cause and the substantial effects this can have on students experiences. Results around the academic induction were relatively consistent across faculties. As we saw last year, students from HPSC were notably more satisfied overall and with several aspects of their academic induction and where possible good practice from this faculty should be identified and shared with others. Students from Science and Engineering were less satisfied overall and also with meeting personal tutors and key course leaders and it may be that more can be done to improve perceptions within this faculty in particular. Education students appeared less satisfied with access to Moodle, introduction to rules and regulations, and introduction to the course rep system. They were also notably less satisfied with aspects of the timetable. Satisfaction with timetable Positively, 2016 was the second year in a row that improved ratings were seen for all aspects of the timetable among all participants. However, as was the case in 2015, Education students and those studying part-time were notably less satisfied. Receiving the timetable in good time continued to attract lower ratings and particularly so for some cohorts. Satisfaction with aspects of timetable Overall -10 -6-2 Timetable remaining consistent -10 -6-4 Lectures / seminars well spaced -11 -7-2 Being informed of changes -13 -6-3 Receiving timetable in good time -9 -10 -5 -40% -20% 0% 20% 44 38 30 50 40 40 32 46 34 40% 42 60% Overall base: 1,619

Satisifed Very dissatisfied Dissatisifed Neither / nore % points 2016 - 2015 % points 2015 - 2014 Notably less satisfied 82.3 +2.1 +2.2 Education 74% Part-time 66% 80.4 +0.2 +5.8 Education 59% EU 75% 79.5 +0.9 +3.9 Trad Comm 74% 78.3 +1.8 +7.3 26 30 73% EU 71% Education 71% 76.1 +2.1 +6.7 80% 100% % participants Very satisifed % satisfied Education 66% Part-time 66% EU 64% 26+ 68% Carer 68% Satisfaction with academic induction Overall, over 8 in 10 students surveyed claimed to be satisfied with their academic induction and ratings were at a similarly high level for half of specific aspects tested, including meeting personal tutors and key course leaders. Less positively, completing enrolment and collecting ID saw a drop in ratings from last year and introduction to the course rep system was again rated less highly. (% good or (% points (% points Satisfaction with aspects of induction Overall satisfaction with university induction -13 (%-3satisfied) -1 Understanding what course of study would entail -13 -2-1 Meeting personal tutor and key course leaders***

-13 -3-2 -2-1 Creating confidence about the learning experience -15 -2-1 Completing enrolment and collecting ID -14 -4 -3 38 31 49 -4 -2 Familiarisation and access to Library / printing services -23 -5 -2 Organised activities to get to know other students -23 -9 Introduction to course rep system -25 10% 44 43 -21 0% 50 38 Introduction to University rules and regulations Overall base: 1,626 46 33 -15 -18 31 39 Queries about studies answered fully and promptly* Familiarisation and access to Moodle / IT services** 52 -3-1 -10 20% 30% satisfied) 2016 - 2015) 2015 - 2014) 83.0% -0.9 2.9 84.0% 1.4

2.4 82.5% 1.3 3.4 82.0% -0.4 4.8* 81.3% 2.8 1.9 80.2% -5.5 2.2 36 40 75.6% 2.7 11.1** 35 40 74.9% 0.5 -1.2 71.0% 5.3 3.9** 63.3% 0.3 7.5 61.8% -0.5 8.8 34 -4 37 33 -4 40% 31 33 50% * Asked access to university staff for queries 2014 Very good Fairly good ** Asked familiarisation and access to Library / IT services 2014 *** Asked introduction to academic and support staff on your course 2015 and 2014 29 60% 70% 80% 90% % participants Very poor

Fairly poor 100% Average Satisfaction with academic induction by faculty Respondents from HPSC were found to be more satisfied with their academic induction, both overall and on several specific measures. Those from Science & Engineering appeared slightly less satisfied overall and with meeting personal tutors and key course leaders. Total (1,626) Arts & Hums (497) Overall satisfaction with university induction 83% 84% 84% 82% 87% 78% 87% 87% Understanding what course of study would entail 84% 84% 83% 83% 89% 84% 88% 88% Meeting personal tutor and key course leaders 83% 85% 83% 87% 85% 75% 84% 83% Queries about studies answered fully and promptly 82% 84% 80% 78% 86% 81% 87% 86% Creating confidence about the learning experience 81% 82%

80% 81% 88% 78% 84% 84% 80% 78% 72% 87% 88% 85% 85% 85% Familiarisation and access to Moodle / IT services 76% 73% 77% 64% 86% 80% 78% 76% Introduction to University rules and regulations 75% 76% 72% 68% 83% 74% 78% 76% Familiarisation and access to Library / printing services 71% 71% 69% 69% 71% 71% 81% 71% Organised activities to get to know other students 63% 62% 65% 66%

64% 62% 64% 67% 62% 60% 60% 54% 76% 62% 63% 63% Completing enrolment and collecting ID Introduction to course rep system Base (for overall satisfaction): In brackets Bus & Law (348) Red: -5% points from total / Green: +5% points from total Education (186) HPSC (209) Sci & Eng (283) Cheshire F (75) Cheshire S (89) Satisfaction with academic induction by student type There was relatively little variation in satisfaction with the academic induction by student type although PPM respondents and within this, particularly part-time postgraduates appeared less satisfied overall and with introduction to university rules and regulations, organised activities to get to know other students and familiarisation and access to Moodle / IT services Total (1,626) UG FT (1,147) UGPT (25)* PG FT (322) PGPT (70) Traditional (593) International (230) PPM (403) Trad Comm (314) Overall satisfaction with university induction 83% 84% 80% 81% 69% 84% 84% 79%

83% Understanding what course of study would entail 84% 84% 85% 83% 84% 85% 78% 85% 85% Meeting personal tutor and key course leaders 83% 81% 81% 87% 84% 82% 85% 84% 79% Queries about studies answered fully and promptly 82% 82% 69% 82% 84% 82% 80% 82% 83% Creating confidence about the learning experience 81% 82% 77% 80% 77% 83% 73% 82% 81% Completing enrolment and collecting ID 80% 82% 92% 78%

67% 80% 81% 77% 84% Familiarisation and access to Moodle / IT services 76% 77% 88% 70% 66% 78% 78% 69% 78% Introduction to University rules and regulations 75% 77% 62% 72% 69% 77% 73% 69% 79% Familiarisation and access to Library / printing services 71% 69% 80% 75% 76% 67% 79% 75% 65% Organised activities to get to know other students 63% 63% 57% 66% 52% 61% 69% 59% 66% 62%

62% 48% 64% 62% 55% 63% 64% 68% Introduction to course rep system Base (for overall satisfaction): In brackets Red: -5% points from total / Green: +5% points from total * Caution very small base Suggested improvements to academic induction 554 participants suggested improvements to their academic induction at Manchester Met. A summary of the most frequently mentioned themes is shown below. More icebreaker / socialising opportunities (17%) I still don't know anybody on my course expect for someone I went to college with. The uni seems to focus on events outside of lectures for people living on campus and as I commute I've found it extremely difficult to get to know people. More team building exercises to get to know people on my course rather than straight into academic inductions. Possibly a activity before the first class to get to know people from the course you're in to help people find friends before the start. So if people have come alone with no friends they might feel a bit comfortable walking into the first class possibly knowing someone from the meet up. There could have been some initiative taken to plan some sort of an activity for us to get to know our course mates better. Base: 554 comments - % of total comments in brackets Improve timetable (13%) Issued too late (6%) More detail on course (Content and structure 5%) Timetable available sooner to manager other commitments e.g. employment. For the induction week they could give more information about how the course works; e.g. the content of the course, how many units we have to complete in our first year etc. Too many changes (3%) Timetable was all messed up in the first week. Said I was in a certain day when I wasn't. Then the email said something different. Issued after course start (2%) Have a clear timetable ready for the induction week before the actual week itself! Received wrong timetable (1%) I personally was given the wrong timetable and it took nearly a full week to get it sorted which included a lot of "I'm not the person you need to ask" conversations and missed phone calls. Induction activities not scheduled (2%) I wasn't given a course induction timetable therefore I didn't know there was anything I needed to attend and missed a week of uni. Detail of assessments (4%) Explaining in more detail how will you be assessed on your course. For

example, how many exams and what percentage it carries etc. Understanding of expectations (2%) Maybe a more detailed document to read through, understanding what'd expected from the students regarding time frames and work load? Reading list (2%) More emails about books I needed to read beforehand and more information in advance. Introduction to Moodle (8%) I would have liked to know more about how to work Moodle and where to find my login etc. I think Moodle is quite complicated. Timetables and assessment questions are all on different places. Most students are struggling to find everything and it is quite easy to miss things. Being told about the MMU app, which includes your timetable and Moodle(learning resources). Contact with course tutors (7%) My personal tutor didn't turn up during induction week - was only made aware in week 3 I should have a personal tutor. I don't feel I got a full introduction of the lecturers who would be teaching me, it all seemed a bit brushed over. My personal tutor seemed disinterested in my tutor group and doesn't Suggested improvements to academic induction A summary of less frequently mentioned issues that related to suggested improvement to the academic induction is shown below. Introduction to library / printing (5%) Enrolment (5%) ID cards organisation (3%) Support for international students (2%) Help with generic / specific study skills (2%) Better introduction to facilities, library and printing. Still no idea how to print anything. ID collection could have been spaced out over a few days prior to the start of term, or more staff deployed to help out due to the ridiculous waiting times. As an exchange student I feel I missed out on a lot of things. I did not have any induction session into my course of study and arrive at classes very unprepared. Help students settle in and giving them help on preparation on how to start academic writing and analysing Include an induction to the library services in induction week as we were expected to use them in tasks set to be completed in the first academic week, which a lot of people found difficult as we had no introduction. Scanning issues / enrolment delays (2%) Help navigating buildings (2%) Introduction to learning facilities (1%) Less repetitive / drawn out (4%) Less induction, I felt like for the first two weeks I was just coming in be told the same, repeated information. Academic induction could have been more concise, found and entire week of

lectures each giving a long drawn out explanation of what the unit would entail too much. Would be nice for lectures to have some academic content from the start. Base: 554 comments - % of total comments in brackets I went to collect my card, I had it scanned, but it wasn't scanned properly - I didn't know this, and my student loan was delayed by over a week because of it. Enrolment into one of my subjects wasn't complete so I may have missed inductions for that subject Probably giving a more in detail tour of the campus and maybe still having helpers around during the first two weeks! More course specific information (2%) Introduction was for another course that briefly mentioned mine. Should have a specific course intro for it Contact with older students (1%) It would have been nice if previous students from last year came and spoke to us about their course and answer any questions we had about it. Acquiring Met Card (2%) Arrange the Met Cards quicker, as there were people struggling to get theirs. Help students settle in and giving them help on preparation on how to start academic writing and analysing Ensure staff well informed (1%) Ensure that seminar tutors are fully informed to answer any questions regarding assessments etc. Better Course Rep introduction (1%) More information given to us about the course rep system. Suggested improvements to academic induction A number of students spoke about a need for better communication and support from the university in general. Here, comments illustrate the significant impact that difficulties and what might be perceived as poor problem resolution can have on students university experience. A number of comments is presented below. Better communication, organisation and support from Manchester Met (6%) My application was not accepted until late when the course had already started. Communication was not great so I missed out on a number of induction sessions. As a mature student coming back into education the systems of communication are completely different. This was something I had to learn to negotiate myself and was not offered guidance. I received no information about induction week or starting at University as I was never asked for my graduation certificate which led to a stressful few weeks and missing induction. Little has been done to integrate new students (like myself) with students who have studied in Crewe for 3 years which have led to an increase in social anxiety, especially in break and lunch times. There are many things that I still don't know. I don't know if I have a personal tutor, I have very hard time understanding my assessment due dates and knowing exactly what they should contain. Getting to uni the first day was so scary I didn't know the way or the city and finding help was particularly difficult. All of the questions that I had before coming must be answered by email (because of phone costs) and it was ineffective and slow. I wasn't sent important documents in the post or notified of important forms that were required to be filled in and sent by post/email before my course started, including forms that had deadlines. I only found out about some of these after I joined a Facebook group about my course. I think that if I had have known about the induction week earlier then the rest of the process might have been smoother. But the enrolling process seemed complex and I had to keep asking why it hadn't completed yet. I don't feel I would have been contacted, hence why I kept contacting the university about my application process. Though I do understand that my course has changed to now being under business and law, but this should've been sorted before we started. I personally was given the wrong timetable and it took nearly a full week to get it sorted which included a lot of "I'm not the person you need to ask" conversations and missed phone calls. I understand that at the time it was the start of a new year and there were obviously a high volume of students with a range of enquiries, but I also feel that things were over-complicated a little and could have been sorted in minutes. For my transfer to access my lectures and Moodle etc. it took about 3 weeks of going to the student hub everyday to to make the transfer official and this was very stressful and has left me behind. The pre-enrolment and induction timings clashed and I had to leave in the middle of my induction to pre-enrol in another building. I was glad that there was a staff to guide me to the building but when I expressed my concern that it is clashing with my induction timetable to the pre-enrolment staff, the reply was "oh, I'm sure they'll understand..." I was not very impressed by their lack of concern. And it is important for me, an international student who doesn't know how the university works yet, to attend the induction to get to know more about the program. Although I was able to find the information I need later, I did miss out a lot on the information for a compulsory fieldcourse and unit enrolments. And because of that my unit enrolment was delayed and I spent the first week of classes being quite lost. Welcome period support and events Section summary (1) The following section presents a summary of perceptions of daytime events and support available on campus during the welcome period. Both The Union and University have a role in delivering events and support through this period and ratings and comments may apply to both organisations. Positively, three quarters of students surveyed rated the welcome period events on campus arranged by The Union and University as good and very few rated them as poor. However, a notable proportion of respondents did not provide a rating (roughly a quarter) and some results around attendance are perhaps disappointing. Claimed attendance of events beyond Freshers Fair and the Welcome Festival was rather limited. Furthermore, while only one in ten Traditional students did not attend any welcome events, this was true for one in three Traditional-commuter students and two thirds of PPM students. While a lack of perceived / actual need or interest is a factor in non-attendance it might be hoped that more students from these cohorts attended events to enhance their experience of starting at Manchester Met, especially where events were specifically designed to help them meet some of the challenges they faced (including forming friendships). A relatively large number of comments from mature and postgraduate students suggested they felt that there was a definite lack of provision or support for them specifically through the welcome period and this remains an area to look to improve for next year. Other commitments are a key barrier to attending more events for this cohort but a perception that the offering was not useful or relevant were widespread too.

Notably, participants from the 26 to 30 age range were the least satisfied with welcome events. It is possible that many students in this age bracket feel that, on the one hand, they are young enough to still looking for and value support, excitement and social opportunities through the welcome period to some degree. On the other, they may find the current offer tailored to younger students and as such could perceive a particular lack of provision to meet their needs. For Traditional-commuter students, social isolation not having people to go with or feeling like they would fit in was claimed as a primary barrier to attendance and normalising the experience of this cohort, convincing them that events are just as much for them as those living on campus and providing more opportunities for them to meet others in a similar situation may be an area to consider for the future. Section summary (2) Lack of knowledge of events was claimed as a barrier to attendance for all cohorts and Traditional students in particular. The difficulty of cutting through the noise of other communications at this time is well recognised and while respondents readily suggested better information on events as an improvement to the welcome period, it will be a challenge of both Union and University to ensure information available reaches and engages new students effectively. Unfortunately, overall ratings for the welcome period in helping prepare students for university life and feel confident about coming to Manchester Met fell in comparison to those recorded in 2015, something that was seen across all student types. Of further note is that: PPM students were again the least satisfied cohort, although perhaps by a greater margin than was seen last year Traditional-commuter students who were notably more satisfied than Traditional in 2015 were no more satisfied in 2016 Cheshire students were also notably less satisfied in 2016 Comments suggest that a focus on more, more relevant, and better advertised events throughout this period could be key in generating improved perceptions of support. That being said, provision of practical information such as that relating to finances, Manchester, and getting around campus should not be ignored. Attendance of welcome events - Manchester The Welcome Festival was attended by almost four in ten participants and a similar proportion claimed to have attended daytime events on campus in addition to the Welcome Festival and Freshers Fair. A third of respondents didnt attend any welcome events at all and this proportion was double that among PPM students. International students aside, limited proportions claimed to have attended events specifically designed to assist / appeal to them. Attendance of daytime campus events Freshers Fair 53 Welcome Festival Attendance of specific welcome events on campus 61 International (137) 37 38 Welcome and Freshers fair 41 Postgraduate / mature (126) 30 11 25 Part-time (12) One or two others 3 32 Several others 7 22 Students with children (27) No others 6 50 Can't remember Commuter trad (98) 11 Didn't attend any at all Didnt attend any Traditional14% International 26% Trad Comm 30% PPM 66% 32 5 20 40

% participants Base: 1,556 60 80 % those in cohort attended additional events 11 Commuter all (222) 3 0 0 % all in cohort 14 20 40 60 80 % participants Base: In brackets, those who attended other welcome events Rating of welcome events Overall, three quarters of respondents rated daytime on campus welcome events as good or excellent. Students from the EU appeared slightly more satisfied, while those in the 26 30 age bracket were less satisfied. Those who attended events specifically designed for their cohort or several events tended to be more satisfied overall. Those who had not attended any were notably less satisfied. Rating of daytime events campus on campus Total good / excellent 76% 16 Excellent More satisfied: - EU 83% 59 Good 22 Average Total good / excellent Where attended Several events 89% One or two events 76% No events 29% 2 Poor Less satisfied - 26 30 63% 0 Terrible 0 20 40 % participants Base: 1,115 - asked to all / excludes dont know 60 80 Barriers to attending welcome events Participants were asked why they had not attended more welcome events. Not knowing about them was most commonly mentioned by Traditional students, followed by clashes with the university timetable while Traditional-commuters emphasised social barriers. PPM students were particularly likely to cite other commitments and a lack of relevance / usefulness. Reasons for non-attendance of events Didn't know / much about them

30 Didn't think events were relevant 27 Clashes with other commitments Traditional Didnt know much about them 35% University clashes 26% Friends didnt want to go 18% Social clashes 17% 25 Didn't have anyone else to go with 20 Clashes with university timetable 19 Didn't think they would be useful Trad Comm Didnt have anyone to go with 29% Didnt feel fit in 22% Didnt know where they were 21% 17 Didn't know where they were 16 Didn't feel comfortable going PPM Clashes other commitments 44% Didnt think relevant 32% Didnt think useful 20% 15 Clashes with other social activities 13 Friends didn't want to go to them 10 Didn't think they would be enjoyable 7 Other people told you not to go 2 0 10 20 Base All 1,169 Manchester who attended less than several other events 30 40 % participants Overall rating of welcome period Three quarters of participants gave an overall rating of seven or above out of ten for the welcome period helping students prepare for university and feel confident about coming to Manchester Met. Ratings fell slightly from 2015 something seen across all demographics. 100 Overall, how satisfied were you with the welcome period in helping you prepare for university life and feel confident about coming to Manchester Met? Total (1,365) 90 29 80 35 31 Overseas (72) 9 to 10

EU (120) 70 Black (77) 7 to 8 7.6 International (212) % participants White (1,065) 7.5 7.6 7.5 7.6 Asian (208) 60 7.6 50 44 47 UK (1,274) 47 40 7.6 30 7.3 7.1 3 to 4 7.0 7.7 19 17 14 10 2 2 6 1 2016 2015 2014 Disability (136) 7.1 7.7 Trad comm (299) 6 1 2016 base 1,365 2016 and 2015 data 1 to 2 7.6 7.4 7.6 Carer (94) Traditional (576) 2016 base in brackets (total weighted *18-24 2015 / **25+ 2015)

Mixed (44) 7.4 PPM (328) 20 0 7.5 5 to 6 18-25* (1,274) Female (1010) Male (476) 26+ **(210) 201 5 Overall rating of welcome period Three quarters of participants gave an overall rating of seven or above out of ten for the welcome period in helping students prepare for university and feel confident about coming to Manchester Met. Ratings fell slightly from 2015 something seen across all faculties and study modes / levels. 100 Overall, how satisfied were you with the welcome period in helping you prepare for university life and feel confident about coming to Manchester Met? Total (1,365) 90 29 80 35 31 % participants 70 9 to 10 7 to 8 Manchester C (1,414) PGPT ( 54) 7.59 Cheshire C (85) 7.5 PGFT (260) 60 50 44 47 7.26 7.51 Arts & Humanities (462) 47 40 6.93 7.16 5 to 6 7.22 UGPT (23)* 3 to 4 30 7.67

20 19 17 14 10 0 1 to 2 Bus & Law (333) 6 1 2 2 6 1 2016 2015 2014 2016 base 1,365 2016 and 2015 data 7.67 7.26 7.37 UGFT (1,106) 7.68 7.66 Education (155) 2016 base in brackets (total weighted *18-24 2015 / **25+ 2015) Cheshire F (72) HPSC (189) Science & Eng (262) 201 5 Suggested improvements to welcome support 237 participants suggested improvements to support over the welcome period at Manchester Met. A summary of the most frequently mentioned themes is shown below. More socialising opportunities / events (11%) More information on events (10%) Help navigating campus / buildings (5%) More information on Manchester / local area (3%) I still don't know anybody on my course expect for someone I went to college with. The uni seems to focus on events outside of lectures for people living on campus and as I commute I've found it extremely difficult to get to know people. More advertising may have been useful, possibly a booklet in the welcome pack/letter making it handy because I had to write out the events that were taking place because every time I wanted to double check I had to go to the welcome page and log in. Less power point lectures on what each department is and organise group walks around the uni so that we know where to find certain areas. Maybe more information about day-today life while living in halls - where the nearest supermarkets/off-licenses are (and their opening times), bus routes, nearby parks, etc.

Maybe some kind of interactive activity (i.e. games) in the union to get new students in & having fun/meeting other new students. More promotion of the different events happening e.g. email/texts. Be able to show everyone in small groups around the campus especially important facilities such as the library, the student hub, student finance help desk Better provision for mature / postgraduate students (10%) Fewer timetable clashes (3%) Feel like more sessions prior to the festivals built specifically for making friends so people are able to feel better integrated. - within flats (3%) There needed to be more focus on PostGrad activities as everything seemed to focus on undergrad students. Arranged meetings with other residents in flats- there are not many opportunities to meet those living above/below you. Stronger postgraduate support/events. I only noticed a couple of meetings for postgraduate, societies etc don't seem geared up for it. Perhaps a welcome party for each halls of residence to help people get to know each other. I felt there was no support for postgrads. Just because I've been to university before, it doesn't necessarily mean I've been to MMU. Base: 237 comments - % of total comments in brackets Improvements to integration with course timetables, I had lectures clashing with the Freshers Fair and sports fair, it was not on for long enough to give everybody a chance to attend. It seemed a shame that only people that had shorter timetables could access most activities. Told more about the area to those that have had to travel quite far. More guides about Manchester as a city. Suggested improvements to welcome support 237 participants suggested improvements to support over the welcome period at Manchester Met. A summary of less frequently mentioned themes is shown below. Better online information (clarity / content to help those unable to attend in person) (3%) Perhaps if more information was online that I might have gotten if I attended some of the events. I couldn't attend due to work commitments (studying whilst working full time). The welcome page information kept changing and was really unclear, for example the timetable. Better Union entertainment events (3%) Less club based welcome events. Freshers parties , MMU Union clubs and societies organise any events on the welcome week. The events for Freshers to be cheaper, the wristband was too expensive Base: 237 comments - % of total comments in brackets More information / support relating to finances (3%) Better support / events for commuter students (2%)

Improve Welcome festival (2%) Helping students understand how to manage their finance and that it is of the upmost importance. Support for commuting students who find it difficult to attend social events and make new friends. I think more support regarding the bursaries available through the university and how to apply for them or find out your eligibility for them should be provided as it is something I particularly struggled with and still am Events for people not living in halls. I would like to comment that the event I did attend on the Sunday at the Business School was not very welcoming. No-one spoke when I arrived and there didn't seem to be a lot going on anyway. Events/ societies for staying home student Support for international students (2%) The festival was definitely over-hyped with regards to the amount that would be available in the day- 5 stalls is hardly a 'festival. Improve Freshers Fair (3%) Making time slots as the queue was extremely big or a more effective way to get people in quicker for the freshers fair. My flat is exclusively international students, yet no one greeted us or offered to guide us. Rather than settling in and enjoying my time exploring in a new place, it was a stressful period. Clubs and societies were placed in a crowded area and the noise levels did not help, so found it difficult to really sign up. Events for EU Students, not just international or meetings/chats with year 2 students. Other mentions included - Support for students with mental health problems - A buddy scheme - More information on clubs and societies Appendix: Motivations and challenges by student type 2014 - 2016 Notes on charts (1) Charts show reasons for choosing university study and Manchester Met by student type between 2014 and 2016 as recorded in the Induction Survey. It is hoped that collecting responses to these questions over a number of years will enable us to better understand any changes in students priorities, challenges and the influence of internal and external factors on these. The following definitions apply. Traditional UKFTUG, Aged 18-25, live in shared student accommodation International All non-UK students, fee status is EU, exchange, overseas PPM Postgraduate or part-time or mature (aged 26 and over), excludes international Traditional-commuter - UKFTUG, Aged 18-25, live at home with partner, relatives or on own and commute to university to study Data is not weighted. Prior to 2016, Mature students were classified as those aged 25 and over. For any enquiries, please contact Ben Cooper, Research Manager - [email protected] Abbreviations used for charts (1) What motivated you to study at university? It is necessary to progress in your current career It is necessary for the job you want to do in the future

For the academic challenge / achievement To improve your job prospects / earning potential To gain increased respect from others The social life at university The experience in general A desire to learn / a deep interest in a particular subject It was expected of you Unsure what to do after school / college / university course Your friends were all going What made you choose Manchester Met over other universities? Location Nightlife / social scene in Manchester or Crewe Culture / range of things to do and see in Manchester or Crewe Reputation of the course Course content appealing / matching your requirements Positive experience of open days / applicant visit day Recommendations of friends and family Recommendation from teacher or other professional Good ratings or reviews in university guides Good ratings on KIS / Unistats Entry requirements particularly suited your qualifications Lack of alternative options / other offers Knowing friends or relatives who were at / going to Manchester Met Quality of academic and campus facilities

Quality of accommodation options Specialism / reputation of academic staff Good communications from Manchester Met prior to making your choice Good employment prospects / focus on employability Reasons for university study and choosing Manchester Met Traditional students 80% 80% What motivated you to study at university? 70% 70% 60% 60% 50% 50% 40% 40% 30% 30% 20% 20% 10% 10% 0% 0% e g e e u s st ct o ng ect spe l lif enc ere f yo o d oin r e e a g t r p t ll o ia ri s c utu cha ros d re Soc xpe t in ed hat ere s t F c p se c e i b l e bje pec re w ds w gr a o a o e J m

r e Su Ex su ien Pr cr ne ad In e c Un Fr G A r ee Base: 598 / 577 / 516 b jo 2014 2015 2016 What made you choose Manchester Met over other universities? Reasons for university study and choosing Manchester Met International students 80% 80% What motivated you to study at university? 70% 70% 60% 60% 50% 50% 40% 40% 30% 30% 20% 20% 10% 10% 0% 0% e g e e u s st ct o ng ect spe l lif enc ere f yo o d oin r e e a g t r p t ll o ia ri s c utu cha ros d re Soc xpe t in ed hat ere s t F c p se

c e i b l e bje pec re w ds w gr a o a o e J m r e Su Ex su ien Pr cr ne ad In e c Un Fr G A r ee Base: 235 / 210 / 168 b jo 2014 2015 2016 What made you choose Manchester Met over other universities? Reasons for university study and choosing Manchester Met PPM students 80% 80% What motivated you to study at university? 70% 70% 60% 60% 50% 50% 40% 40% 30% 30% 20% 20% 10% 10% 0% 0% e g e e u s st ct o ng ect spe l lif enc ere f yo o d oin r e e a g

t r p t ll o ia ri s c utu cha ros d re Soc xpe t in ed hat ere s t F c p se c e i b l e bje pec re w ds w gr a o a o e J m r e Su Ex su ien Pr cr ne ad In e c Un Fr G A r ee Base: 412 / 339 / 248 b jo 2014 2015 2016 What made you choose Manchester Met over other universities? Reasons for university study and choosing Manchester Met Trad Comm students 80% 80% What motivated you to study at university? 70% 70% 60% 60% 50% 50% 40% 40% 30% 30% 20% 20% 10% 10% 0% 0% e g

e e u s st ct o ng ect spe l lif enc ere f yo o d oin r e e a g t r p t ll o ia ri s c utu cha ros d re Soc xpe t in ed hat ere s t F c p se c e i b l e bje pec re w ds w gr a o a o e J m r e Su Ex su ien Pr cr ne ad In e c Un Fr G A r ee Base: 315 / 285 / 294 b jo 2014 2015 2016 What made you choose Manchester Met over other universities? Abbreviations used for charts (2) Which of the following aspects of university life, if any, did you find most challenging when you first began at Manchester Met? Making friends and developing a social network Your course not being what you expected it to be Getting settled into your accommodation Getting used to using the different learning resources Understanding and organising your finances Feeling lonely and / or homesick

Getting involved in activities like clubs, societies or volunteering Finding your way around university campus Adapting to volume / difficulty of work and new styles of learning Understanding what was expected of you academically Living independently away from home Living with other students Understanding how your course is structured / works Knowing who / where to go for help when you needed it Settling into life in Manchester / Crewe Integrating with other students in lectures and seminars Finding part-time employment to fit around studies Juggling studies with other commitments e.g. employment and caring g in g g n in le g l n a lle ch a lly ch t ia n i i a in m e r s r ba rs t a s r b Fi d n co Se /s oc ia Co ur se

ln et wo Se rk ttl ex in pe g in ct ati to on ac Di co s ffe m re m nt od le ati ar on ni ng re so Or ur ga ce ni s sin g fin an Cl Lo ub ce n e s, s ly so /h ci e om tie es s i ck Fin or vo di ng lu nt yo ee ur rin w Ad g a ya ap tin ro un g to d un wo i rk Ac /l ad ea em rn in ic

g ex pe ct Li v ati in on g in s de pe Li v nd in en g Un tly o th de e rs rs ta tu nd de in Kn nt g ow s co in ur g se wh Se wo er ttl rk e in s to g in g o to fo l if rh In e te el in gr p M ati a n ng /C le re Fin ct we ur di es ng /s pa em rttim in ar e s em pl oy Ot m he en

rc t om m itm en ts Fr ie nd s Initial and persisting challenges faced at Manchester Met Traditional students 50% 45% 40% 35% 30% 25% 20% 15% 10% 5% 0% Base: 598 / 577 / 516 2014 2015 2016 /s oc ia Co ur se ln et wo Se rk ttl ex in pe g in ct ati to on ac Di co s ffe m re m nt od le ati ar on ni ng re so Or ur ga ce ni s sin g fin an Cl Lo ub

ce n e s, s ly so /h ci e om tie es s i ck Fin or di vo ng lu nt yo ee ur r in w Ad g a ya ap tin ro un g to d un wo i rk Ac /l ad ea em rn in ic g ex pe ct Li v ati in on g in s de pe Li v nd in en g Un tly o th de e rs rs ta tu nd de in Kn nt g ow s co in ur g se wh Se wo er ttl rk

e in s to g in g o to fo l if rh In e te el in gr p M ati a n ng /C le re Fin ct we ur di es ng /s pa em rttim in ar e s em pl oy Ot m he en rc t om m itm en ts Fr ie nd s Initial and persisting challenges faced at Manchester Met International students 50.00% 45.00% 40.00% 35.00% 30.00% 25.00% 20.00% 15.00% 10.00% 5.00% 0.00% Base: 235 / 210 / 168 2014 2015 2016 /s oc ia Co

ur se ln et wo Se rk ttl ex in pe g in ct ati to on ac Di co s ffe m re m nt od le ati ar on ni ng re so Or ur ga ce ni s sin g fin an Cl Lo ub ce n e s, s ly so /h ci e om tie es s i ck Fin or vo di ng lu nt yo ee ur rin w Ad g a ya ap tin ro un g to d un wo i rk Ac /l ad ea em rn

in ic g ex pe ct Li v ati in on g in s de pe Li v nd in en g Un tly o th de e rs rs ta tu nd de in Kn nt g ow s co in ur g se wh Se wo er ttl rk e in s to g in g o to fo l if rh In e te el in gr p M ati a n ng /C le re Fin ct we ur di es ng /s pa em rttim in ar e s em pl oy Ot m

he en rc t om m itm en ts Fr ie nd s Initial and persisting challenges faced at Manchester Met PPM students 50% 45% 40% 35% 30% 25% 20% 15% 10% 5% 0% Base: 412 / 339 / 248 2014 2015 2016 /s oc ia Co ur se ln et wo Se rk ttl ex in pe g in ct ati to on ac Di co s ffe m re m nt od le ati ar on ni ng re so Or ur ga ce ni s sin g fin an Cl

Lo ub ce n e s, s ly so /h ci e om tie es s i ck Fin or vo di ng lu nt yo ee ur rin w Ad g a ya ap tin ro un g to d un wo i rk Ac /l ad ea em rn in ic g ex pe ct Li v ati in on g in s de pe Li v nd in en g Un tly o th de e rs rs ta tu nd de in Kn nt g ow s co in ur g se wh Se wo er

ttl rk e in s to g in g o to fo l if rh In e te el in gr p M ati a n ng /C le re Fin ct we ur di es ng /s pa em rttim in ar e s em pl oy Ot m he en rc t om m itm en ts Fr ie nd s Initial and persisting challenges faced at Manchester Met Trad Comm students 50% 45% 40% 35% 30% 25% 20% 15% 10% 5% 0% Base: 315 / 285 / 294 2014 2015 2016

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