Improving nutrient use and manure management for sustainable

Improving nutrient use and manure management for sustainable

Improving nutrient use and manure management for sustainable and resilient agricultural systems Martien van Nieuwkoop, Global Director, Agriculture & Food The World Bank DEC, 3 2019 Global efficiency of added nutrients to soils through organic and synthetic fertilizers is only about 50% leading to 12% of total Emissions from Agriculture and aquatic pollution. KEY MESSAGES Better nutrient efficiency through better fertilizer application, manure management and recycling of nutrients will contribute to making low-input more productive and high-input systems less emissions intense. .Proven management practices that increase nutrient efficiency exist. However, more work is needed to enable these practices to be implemented at scale.

KEY ACTION AREAS Increasing public awareness & technical assistance; Realigning policies and financial mechanisms to incentivize nutrient and manure management planning; Improving soil data quality & Monitoring, Reporting and Verification. Better nutrient management for raising yields and decreasing greenhouse gases needed Improving nutrient use efficiency may increase production by up to 70% for most crops and contribute significantly to closing global yield gaps. ND Mueller et al. Nature 000, 1-4 (2012) doi:10.1038/nature11420 Improving nutrient use efficiency could mitigate 0.71 GtCO2e annually by 2030 Griscom et. al 2017 Three priority action areas to advance the nutrient and manure management

agenda To promote the nutrient and manure management agenda, we propose three priority action areas: o Priority #1: Making nutrient and manure management a priority in NDCs o Priority #2: Realigning public and private support for improving nutrient and manure management o Priority #3: Improving Monitoring, Reporting and Verification (MRV) for nutrient and manure management Priority #1: Making nutrient and manure management a priority in NDCs Less than 25% of countries focused on mitigation commitments directly related to both fertilizer (43 countries) and manure management (46 countries) Technical assistance is needed to support countries to define and/or raise the ambition of nutrient management targets in their NDCs as well as to capture and disseminate the (co-)benefits of the improved nutrient use efficiency achieved

Country updates to NDCs will be important entry points for providing technical support and awareness-raising KJWA could focus on: Encouraging technical agencies to issue guidance for including nutrient management aspects into NDCs Promoting the prevention of soil degradation as a key intervention Enable NDC Partnership to provide nutrient management related support to help countries to implement their NDCs Priority #2: Realigning public and private support for improving nutrient and manure management More work is needed to identify global hot spots for nutrient management as well as to realign public and private support for delivering public-good outcomes that promote nutrient use efficiency. Promising strategies include: Improving soil data quality and availability to farmers Tailoring regulations, incentives, and outreach to local conditions as there is no blueprint Improving extension and knowledge transfer systems KJWA could focus on: Developing a policy brief under the Technology Executive Committee (TEC)13 on

designing policy reforms to reduce distortions in public support programs related to nutrient management Drafting inputs to Green Climate Fund (GCF) strategy development to identify hot spots and leverage public and private investments toward improving nutrient management in hot spot areas Priority #3: Improving Monitoring, Reporting and Verification (MRV) for nutrient and manure management Assessments of fertilizer-derived emissions and the accuracy of mitigation protocols needs to be improved MRV related compliance cost needs to be lowered A standardized, accurate and low cost approach to MRV for assessing nutrient use efficiency in the context of productivity and emission trade-offs would provide a significant rationale for the use of public funds in support of improving nutrient and manure management KJWA could focus on: Mobilizing requests from countries for support under the Climate Technology Centre and Network (CTCN)16 for Tools and methodologies for MRV on nutrient management Global guidelines for fertilizer use

e: Soil management and manure management often go hand in hand Uruguay - Sustainable management of natural resources and climate change (DAC Objective & Means Soil and manure manageme nt approaches Impacts To support Uruguay's efforts to promote farmer Establishment of an Agricultural Information and Decision Support System adoption of climate-smart agricultural and livestock practices, and improved natural

On Farm CSA-Investments and Livestock resource management practices in project Management areas Capacity Building and Training Soil Management Use Plans for sustainable land use practices Sustainable Intensification of Livestock Sector Crop rotation and ground cover to minimize erosion and land degradation Regulated use of agrochemicals, including monitoring of applications, to reduce emissions from main agricultural systems Minimize and collect all effluent waste 2,509,000 hectares of land are under sustainable land management practices 36% increase in adaptive capacity, measured by a vulnerability matrix at department level including socio-economic, biophysical, and technical indicators

DACC on-farm investment in CSA has supported 5,139 farmers to Integrated soil nutrient management as part of integrated CSA projects launched: China - Climate Smart Staple Crop Production Project To reduce GHG emissions in crop production, by improving efficiency of agricultural inputs (e.g. fertilizer, pesticides, irrigation water and agriculture machinery) and by promoting smart climate crop production systems Integrated Application of formula fertilizer and mechanized deep fertilization services to of package avoid over-fertilization & pilot of new techniques such as the use of new of CSA fertilizers (e.g., sulfur, slow release fertilizers, etc.) technologie Precision pesticide application through procurement of high efficiency pest s management equipment and professional pest management services resulting in

strong soil Promotion of water conservation and efficient irrigation practices, e.g., laser land leveling and improvement of irrigation and drainage systems benefits Conservation agriculture production techniques, e.g., crop residues returning to field, minimum tillage and no-tillage Piloting of alternative crop rotation production systems Promotion of agroforestry INTEGRATION Objective THANK YOU Martien van Nieuwkoop, Global Director, Agriculture & Food [email protected] Annex: Public Finance: Aligning Incentives for Adoption of Climate Smart Agriculture Options

Public Support to Agriculture by Category (2015-17) Total: US$ 570 billion per year Market Price Support; 51.42% Production Payments; 22.07% Input Subsidies; 10.31% Public Goods; 16.20% Environme ntal Purposes

1% Equivalent to 28% of Agriculture Value Added Two formsSector of public support have the most distortive potential: Coupled subsidies (i.e., tied to inputs or outputs): fertilizer subsidies, in particular, have contributed to the overuse of nitrogen fertilizer globally resulting in high GHG emissions and other environmental problems; Price support, which encourages overproduction of certain commodities and inefficient use of limited natural resources, and in some notable cases encourage land use conversion

Annex: Better nutrient management for raising yields and decreasing greenhouse gases needed ND Mueller et al. Nature 000, 1-4 (2012) doi:10.1038/nature11420 WHAT MAKES THE PROJECT STAND OUT WHAT The focus is agricultural production in a sustainable way. The project emphasizes increasing farmers productivity, while lowering emissions and impact on the natural environment. With a population of 3.7 million people, Uruguay currently produces food for 28 M people. The vision by 2050 is to produce food for 50 million people. Driving innovation in climate-smart agricultural agenda

HOW Taking a climate-smart agricultural approach, the country has quadrupled its agricultural production within a decade, while increasing the resilience and adaptation of their productive systems to climate change, and significantly reducing GHG emission associated with food production. The project has supported the set-up and design of the National Agricultural Information System (SNIA). SNIA facilitates the integration of dispersed agriculture, natural resource management and new climate-related information from 32 national agencies in an online state-of-the-art platform

tailored to the needs of different users. Farmers access to internet allows the application of early-warning system for livestock management, an agrochemical control system, rural risk assessments, soil and land use plans, water studies for irrigation and precise climate forecasts. To date it has seen over 70,000 uses and supported 9 important public-sector decisions.

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