Newtons Laws of Motion Review Background Sir Isaac

Newtons Laws of Motion Review Background Sir Isaac

Newtons Laws of Motion Review Background Sir Isaac Newton (1643-1727) an English scientist and mathematician famous for his discovery of the law of gravity also discovered the three laws of motion. He published them in his book Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica (mathematic principles of

natural philosophy) in 1687. Today these laws are known as Newtons Laws of Motion and describe the motion of all objects on the scale we experience in our everyday lives. If I have ever made any valuable discoveries, it has been owing more to patient attention, than to any other talent. -Sir Isaac Newton Newtons Laws of Motion 1. An object in motion tends to stay

in motion and an object at rest tends to stay at rest unless acted upon by an unbalanced force. 2. Force equals mass times acceleration (F = ma). 3. For every action there is an equal and opposite reaction.

Newtons First Law An object at rest tends to stay at rest and an object in motion tends to stay in motion unless acted upon by an unbalanced force. What does this mean? Basically, an object will keep doing what it was doing unless acted on by an unbalanced force. If the object was sitting still, it

will remain stationary. If it was moving at a constant velocity, it will keep moving. It takes force to change the motion of an object. What is meant by unbalanced force? If the forces on an object are equal and opposite, they are said to be balanced, and the object experiences no change in motion. If they are not equal and opposite, then the forces are unbalanced

and the motion of the object changes. Some Examples from Real Life A soccer ball is sitting at rest. It takes an unbalanced force of a kick to change its motion. Two teams are playing tug of are both exerting equal force in opposite directions. This force results in no change of

war. They on the rope balanced motion. Newtons First Law is also called the Law of Inertia Inertia: the tendency of an object to resist changes in its state of motion The First Law states that all objects have inertia. The more mass an object has, the more inertia it has

(and the harder it is to change its motion). More Examples from Real Life A powerful locomotive begins to pull a long line of boxcars that were sitting at rest. Since the boxcars are so massive, they have a great deal of inertia and it takes a large force to change their motion. Once they are moving, it takes a large force

to stop them. On your way to school, a bug flies into your windshield. Since the bug is so small, it has very little inertia and exerts a very small force on your car (so small that you dont even feel it). If objects in motion tend to stay in motion, why dont moving objects keep moving forever?

Things dont keep moving forever because theres almost always an unbalanced force acting upon it. A book sliding across a table slows down and stops because of the force of friction. If you throw a ball upwards it will eventually slow down and fall because of the force of gravity. In outer space, away from gravity

and any sources of friction, a rocket ship launched with a certain speed and direction would keep going in that same direction and at that same speed forever. Newtons Second Law Force equals mass times acceleration. F = ma Acceleration: a measurement of how quickly an object is changing speed.

What does F = ma mean? Force is directly proportional to mass and acceleration. Imagine a ball of a certain mass moving at a certain acceleration. This ball has a certain force. Now imagine we make the ball twice as big (double the mass) but keep the acceleration constant. F = ma says that this new ball has twice the force of the old ball. Now the the the

imagine the original ball moving at twice original acceleration. F = ma says that ball will again have twice the force of ball at the original acceleration. More about F = ma If you double the mass, you double the force. If you double the acceleration, you double the force. What if you double the mass and the acceleration? (2m)(2a) = 4F Doubling the mass and the acceleration quadruples

the force. So . . . what if you decrease the mass by half? How much force would the object have now? What does F = ma say? F = ma basically means that the force of an object comes from its mass and its acceleration. Something very massive (high mass) thats changing speed very slowly (low acceleration), like a glacier, can still have great force.

Something very small (low mass) thats changing speed very quickly (high acceleration), like a bullet, can still have a great force. Something very small changing speed very slowly will have a very weak force. Newtons Third Law For every action there is an equal and opposite reaction.

What does this mean? For every force acting on an object, there is an equal force acting in the opposite direction. Right now, gravity is pulling you down in your seat, but Newtons Third Law says your seat is pushing up against you with equal force. This is why you are not moving. There is a balanced force acting on you gravity pulling down, your seat pushing up. Think about it . . . What happens if you are standing on a

skateboard or a slippery floor and push against a wall? You slide in the opposite direction (away from the wall), because you pushed on the wall but the wall pushed back on you with equal and opposite force. Why does it hurt so much when you stub your toe? When your toe exerts a force on a rock, the rock exerts an equal force back on your toe. The harder you hit your toe against it, the more force the rock exerts back on your toe (and the more your toe

hurts). Review Newtons First Law: Objects in motion tend to stay in motion and objects at rest tend to stay at rest unless acted upon by an unbalanced force. Newtons Second Law: Force equals mass times acceleration (F = ma).

Newtons Third Law: For every action there is an equal and opposite reaction. Inertia: Vocabulary the tendency of an object to resist changes in its state of motion Acceleration:

a change in velocity a measurement of how quickly an object is changing speed, direction or both Velocity: The rate of change of a position along a straight line with respect to time Force: strength or energy

Recently Viewed Presentations

  • Physics 12 UCSD Global Warming Now What? 2Q

    Physics 12 UCSD Global Warming Now What? 2Q

    A Recipe for Climate Change 4 Q Spring 2013 * Reminders HW 7 due Friday Quiz 8 also on Friday Extra Credit (2% of final grade) available on TED Will do review session during 10th week exam on Wednesday, 6/12,...
  • Case Study: Foreign Body - Salt Lake Podiatry Center Blog

    Case Study: Foreign Body - Salt Lake Podiatry Center Blog

    Case Study: CC: painful, red, swollen L foot. HPI: 49 yo male with 1 week hx of painful, red swollen foot. Pt was vacationing in Fiji when he stepped barefoot on a sharp piece of coral.
  • Unit 2

    Unit 2

    What type of triangle is this? Find the missing angle. Since it has two congruent sides (two sides are equal), this is an isosceles triangle. Since all the angles are less than 90°, this is also an acute triangle. Acute...
  • Organization Structure - SOSC

    Organization Structure - SOSC

    SOSC management has made significant strides in responding to recommendations from the 2016 Structure Assessment Task Force report. Los Angeles County is an undeveloped market, with great potential to add new programs, supporters and athletes. Consistency in program delivery needs...
  • Smh Dka Protocol

    Smh Dka Protocol

    SMH DKA PROTOCOL Physician Information ... If urine output less than 30 ml/hr Creatinine greater than 2.0 Potassium less than 3.0 or greater than 6 If hypoglycemia not resolved per protocol in 20 minutes When the accucheck is less than...
  • Fundamental Principles of American Democracy

    Fundamental Principles of American Democracy

    The young United States was large and represented people of different cultural backgrounds, economic conditions, and religious beliefs. The classical republican idea of civic virtue conflicted with the Founders' belief in natural rights and with their understanding of human nature...
  • Chapter 025 - Checks & Digital Banking

    Chapter 025 - Checks & Digital Banking

    Indorser - The payee who indorses a check to another party. Indorsee - The party to whom a check is indorsed. Special Types of Checks Bank Checks - Checks for which the bank is solely or primarily liable. Certified Check...
  • Unit 6: Poetry

    Unit 6: Poetry

    Meter is a generally regular pattern of stressed ( /) and unstressed (∨) syllables in poetry or verse. Just as we can measure distance in meters, we can measure the beats in a poem in meter. Each rhythmic unit is...