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Please sign in with FULL NAME and TEACHER NAME! Example: Sue Perkid Mrs. A. Mazing Welcome to English III Live Lessons! Module 5 Live Lessons & Collaboration To Check Your Sound and Microphone Tools > Audio > Audio WizardTools > Audio > Audio Wizard > Tools > Audio > Audio WizardAudio > Tools > Audio > Audio WizardAudio Wizard H e c r e

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p e n i b m u r K Mrs. What is in Module 5? 5.00 Pretest 5.01 Hyphen & Syntax Quiz 5.02 Reading Poetry 5.03 The Art of Language 5.04 Understanding 20th Century Poetry 5.05 Analyzing 20th Century Poetry 5.06 Post Test

5.07 Discussion Based Assessment 5.02 Reading Poetry Inferences: Meanings deciphered by the reader that may not be explicitly stated in the text. On the Pulse of Morning by Maya Angelou A Rock, A River, A Tree Hosts to species long since departed, Marked the mastodon, The dinosaur, who left dried tokens Of their sojourn here On our planet floor, Any broad alarm of their hastening doom Is lost in the gloom of dust and ages. But today, the Rock cries out to us, clearly, forcefully,

Come, you may stand upon my Back and face your distant destiny, But seek no haven in my shadow. I will give you no hiding place down here. You, created only a little lower than The angels, have crouched too long in The bruising darkness Have lain too long Face down in ignorance. Your mouths spilling words Armed for slaughter. The Rock cries out to us today, you may stand upon me, But do not hide your face. Across the wall of the world, A River sings a beautiful song. It says, Come, rest here by my side. Each of you, a bordered country, Delicate and strangely made proud, Yet thrusting perpetually under siege.

Your armed struggles for profit Have left collars of waste upon My shore, currents of debris upon my breast. Yet today I call you to my riverside, If you will study war no more. Come, Clad in peace, and I will sing the songs The Creator gave to me when I and the Tree and the rock were one. Before cynicism was a bloody sear across your Brow and when you yet knew you still Knew nothing. The River sang and sings on. There is a true yearning to respond to The singing River and the wise Rock. So say the Asian, the Hispanic, the Jew The African, the Native American, the Sioux, The Catholic, the Muslim, the French, the Greek The Irish, the Rabbi, the Priest, the Sheik, The Gay, the Straight, the Preacher,

The privileged, the homeless, the Teacher. They hear. They all hear The speaking of the Tree. They hear the first and last of every Tree Speak to humankind today. Come to me, here beside the River. Plant yourself beside the River. Each of you, descendant of some passed On traveller, has been paid for. You, who gave me my first name, you, Pawnee, Apache, Seneca, you Cherokee Nation, who rested with me, then Forced on bloody feet, Left me to the employment of Other seekers desperate for gain, Starving for gold. You, the Turk, the Arab, the Swede, the German, the Eskimo, the Scot, You the Ashanti, the Yoruba, the Kru, bought, Sold, stolen, arriving on the nightmare

Praying for a dream. Here, root yourselves beside me. I am that Tree planted by the River, Which will not be moved. I, the Rock, I the River, I the Tree I am yours your passages have been paid. Lift up your faces, you have a piercing need For this bright morning dawning for you. History, despite its wrenching pain Cannot be unlived, but if faced With courage, need not be lived again. Lift up your eyes upon This day breaking for you. Give birth again To the dream. Women, children, men, Take it into the palms of your hands, Mold it into the shape of your most Private need. Sculpt it into

The image of your most public self. Lift up your hearts Each new hour holds new chances For a new beginning. Do not be wedded forever To fear, yoked eternally To brutishness. The horizon leans forward, Offering you space to place new steps of change. Here, on the pulse of this fine day You may have the courage To look up and out and upon me, the Rock, the River, the Tree, your country. No less to Midas than the mendicant. No less to you now than the mastodon then. Here, on the pulse of this new day You may have the grace to look up and out And into your sister's eyes, and into Your brother's face, your country

And say simply Very simply With hope Good morning. One Today by Richard Blanco One sun rose on us today, kindled over our shores, peeking over the Smokies, greeting the faces of the Great Lakes, spreading a simple truth across the Great Plains, then charging across the Rockies. One light, waking up rooftops, under each one, a story told by our silent gestures moving behind windows. My face, your face, millions of faces in morning's mirrors, each one yawning to life, crescendoing into our day: pencil-yellow school buses, the rhythm of traffic lights, fruit stands: apples, limes, and oranges arrayed like rainbows begging our praise. Silver trucks heavy with oil or paper bricks or milk, teeming over highways alongside us, on our way to clean tables, read ledgers, or save lives

to teach geometry, or ring-up groceries as my mother did for twenty years, so I could write this poem for all of us today. All of us as vital as the one light we move through, the same light on blackboards with lessons for the day: equations to solve, history to question, or atoms imagined, the "I have a dream" we keep dreaming, or the impossible vocabulary of sorrow that won't explain the empty desks of twenty children marked absent today, and forever. Many prayers, but one light breathing color into stained glass windows, life into the faces of bronze statues, warmth onto the steps of our museums and park benches as mothers watch children slide into the day. One ground. Our ground, rooting us to every stalk of corn, every head of wheat sown by sweat and hands, hands gleaning coal or planting windmills in deserts and hilltops that keep us warm, hands digging trenches, routing pipes and cables, hands

as worn as my father's cutting sugarcane so my brother and I could have books and shoes. The dust of farms and deserts, cities and plains mingled by one windour breath. Breathe. Hear it through the day's gorgeous din of honking cabs, buses launching down avenues, the symphony of footsteps, guitars, and screeching subways, the unexpected song bird on your clothes line. Hear: squeaky playground swings, trains whistling, or whispers across caf tables, Hear: the doors we open for each other all day, saying: hello, shalom, buon giorno, howdy, namaste, or buenos das in the language my mother taught mein every language spoken into one wind carrying our lives without prejudice, as these words break from my lips. One sky: since the Appalachians and Sierras claimed their majesty, and the Mississippi and Colorado worked their way to the sea. Thank the work of our hands:

weaving steel into bridges, finishing one more report for the boss on time, stitching another wound or uniform, the first brush stroke on a portrait, or the last floor on the Freedom Tower jutting into a sky that yields to our resilience. One sky, toward which we sometimes lift our eyes tired from work: some days guessing at the weather of our lives, some days giving thanks for a love that loves you back, sometimes praising a mother who knew how to give, or forgiving a father who couldn't give what you wanted. We head home: through the gloss of rain or weight of snow, or the plum blush of dusk, but alwayshome, always under one sky, our sky. And always one moon like a silent drum tapping on every rooftop and every window, of one countryall of us facing the stars hopea new constellation waiting for us to map it,

waiting for us to name ittogether. 5.02 Assignment Respond to one of the following prompts in two to three paragraphs. Citing textual evidence from "On the Pulse of Morning" and " One Today:" describe some of the challenges facing the American people during the late 20th and early 21st centuries or explain the effects of cultural diversity among the American people during the late 20th and early 21st centuries Lets Find Citations describe some effects of cultural diversity among the American people in the late 20th and early 21st centuries On the Pulse of Morning

One Today MLA Citations Example: This style of citation includes the author in the introductory portion of the quote In Maya Angelous On the Pulse of Morning, the narrator states A Rock, A River, A Tree / Hosts to species long since departed (1-2). Or Use hyphen to separate lines After the citation are the line numbers The narrator states, A Rock, A River, A Tree / Hosts to species long since departed (Angelou 1-2).

Paragraph 1 Introduce the poem On the Pulse of Morning Introduce the poems author, Maya Angelou Explain how the poem reflects the effects of cultural diversity Use citations to support your idea Paragraph 2 Introduce the poem One Today Introduce the poems author, Richard Blanco Explain how the poem reflects the effects of cultural diversity Use citations to support your idea 5.05 Choose two poems and create a presentation explaining the ways in which the literary works were influenced by the events of this time period. "Rhapsody on a Windy Night" by T.S. Eliot "Mending Wall" by Robert Frost

"Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening" by Robert Frost "The River Merchant's Wife: A Letter" by Ezra Pound "The Red Wheelbarrow" by William Carlos Williams "Languages" by Carl Sandburg "Fog" by Carl Sandburg Carl Sandburg Just as modern American drama had its beginnings in little theatres, modern American poetry took form in little magazines. Particularly important was Poetry: A Magazine of Verse, founded by Harriet Monroe in Chicago in 1912. The surrounding region soon became prominent as the home of three poets: Vachel Lindsay, Carl Sandburg, and Edgar Lee Masters. 1878-1967 Sandburg wrote of life on the prairies and in Midwestern cities in Whitmanesque free verse in such volumes as Chicago Poems (1916) and The People, Yes (1936).

Fog by Carl Sandburg The fog comes on little cat feet. What is the setting? How do you know? It sits looking over harbor and city on silent haunches and then moves on. How does the speaker feel about this fog? Robert Frost Two New England poets, Edwin Arlington Robinson

and Robert Frost, who were not noted for technical experimentation, won both critical and popular acclaim in this period. Like Robinson, Frost used traditional stanzas and blank verse. The best-known poet of his generation, Frost, like Robinson, saw and commented upon the tragic aspects of lifeFrost memorably crafted the language of common speech into traditional poetic form, with epigrammatic effect. 1874-1963 Stopping By Woods on a Snowy Evening Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening Whose woods these are I think I know. His house is in the village though; He will not see me stopping here

To watch his woods fill up with snow. My little horse must think it queer To stop without a farmhouse near Between the woods and frozen lake The darkest evening of the year. He gives his harness bells a shake To ask if there is some mistake. The only other sound's the sweep Of easy wind and downy flake. The woods are lovely, dark, and deep. But I have promises to keep, And miles to go before I sleep, And miles to go before I sleep. What is the setting? How do you know? How is the speaker feeling?

What events occurred in the early 20th century that may influence these writers? Lets look again at the poetry and see if we can find some citations to help support our ideas. The fog comes on little cat feet. It sits looking over harbor and city on silent haunches and then moves on. Note the personification of the fog as it sits looking / over the harbor and city / on silent haunches / and then moves on (Sandburg 3-6).

Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening Whose woods these are I think I know. His house is in the village though; He will not see me stopping here To watch his woods fill up with snow. My little horse must think it queer To stop without a farmhouse near Between the woods and frozen lake The darkest evening of the year. He gives his harness bells a shake To ask if there is some mistake. The only other sound's the sweep Of easy wind and downy flake. The woods are lovely, dark, and deep. But I have promises to keep, And miles to go before I sleep, And miles to go before I sleep.

Some people interpret this poem being about death. What evidence supports this? Is the death literal? Is he mourning the death of something else? MLA Citations Example: This style of citation includes the author in the introductory portion of the quote In Carl Sandburgs poem Fog, the narrator states The fog comes / on little cat feet (1-2). Or Use hyphen to separate lines

After the citation are the line numbers The narrator states, The fog comes /on little cat feet (Sandburg 12). Lets put it all together - Find 2 images (1 per poem) - Write an explanation of how each poem is influenced by 20th century events. - Include citations for added strength - Create a multimedia presentation (examples include powerpoint, prezi, etc.) Complete your 5.02 paragraphs and 5.05 multimedia presentation and submit to your teacher. Be sure to go back and complete any other assignments in module 5 that include quizzes and written work.

Schedule your module 5 DBA with your teacher as soon as you are ready. If you need collaboration credit (1 per Collaboration Reflection Thank you for attending todays > Audio > Audio Wizard Live Les > Audio > Audio Wizards > Audio > Audio Wizardon Collaboration Ses > Audio > Audio Wizards > Audio > Audio Wizardion. Please respond to the following questions and submit your responses for the Collaboration Assignment in the course. You may answer directly in the student comment section, or upload this document. You must submit these responses to earn credit for your attendance. In a complete sentence, please share the date and time of the session you attended, as well as the teacher/moderator's name.

In 3-5 sentences, please discuss your specific contributions to the collaboration you attended. What were your comments in the chat box and whiteboard, and did you share any information over the microphone with the group? In 3-5 sentences, please discuss how your attendance in the collaborations improved your English 3 assessment submissions. How did the session help you better understand the content? Please specifically state at least one thing you have learned from the collaboration. Briefly describe what a collaboration is in your opinion? Please discuss how interacting with your classmates enhanced your English 3 virtual experience.

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