TOPIC: December Exam Revision REVIEW: The exam paper

TOPIC: December Exam Revision REVIEW: The exam paper

TOPIC: December Exam Revision REVIEW: The exam paper is one hour long and covers all the work from the first term. The paper is divided into the following four sections: Section A: 50 marks - 17 Short answer questions. Section B: 20 marks - Six source questions using six sources. Make sure to QTS. Section C: 15 marks - Multiple Choice questions using historical skills. Section D: 15 marks - Extended writing - Who should be King of England in 1066? REVIEW: 2. Definitions: decade a period of ten consecutive years beginning with a year whose last digit is zero: the decade of the 1980s. century a period of 100 consecutive years; Latin centuria, a group of a hundred millennium a period of 1,000 consecutive years; Latin mlle, thousand chronology - The science that deals with the determination of dates and the sequence of events. The arrangement of facts and events in the order of time. Activity #1 Historians put the events of time in chronological order. Copy the

diagram into your exercise books. For Example: BC dates start with HIGH numbers and go DOWN to LOW numbers. AD 2016 2000 BC AD 1500 1500 BC

500 BC 1 1AD 1000 1000 BC 1 AD 500 For Example: AD dates start with LOW numbers

and go UP to HIGH numbers. There is NO year 0. A century is recorded from 00 to 99. For example, the 16th century is from 1501 to 1600. When a year ends in 00, like 1600, it is in the 16th century. OBJECTIVES: 1. Identify key terms that affect time. 2. Understand how to order time in BC and AD years. Activity #2 Put the following dates in chronological order oldest to youngest: 1 2 3 4

5 6 AD 1815 AD 1901 1815 BC 2000 BC AD 1962 AD 1901 AD 2014 AD 899 1600 BC 3000 BC

1600 BC AD 1005 AD 1066 AD 1966 850 BC 1000 BC AD 1066 4000 BC AD 1509 AD 989 3000 BC

4000 BC 6 BC 1003 BC 1 2 3 4 5 6 _________ _________ _________

_________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________

_________ _________ _________ _________ _________ ________ ________ ________ ________ ________ Activity #2 Put the following dates in chronological order oldest to youngest: 1

2 3 4 5 6 AD 1815 AD 1901 1815 BC 2000 BC AD 1962 AD 1901

AD 2014 AD 899 1600 BC 3000 BC 1600 BC AD 1005 AD 1066 AD 1966 850 BC 1000 BC AD 1066 4000 BC

AD 1509 AD 989 3000 BC 4000 BC 6 BC 1003 BC 1 2 3 4 5

6 AD 1066 AD 899 3000 BC 4000 BC 1600 BC 4000 BC AD 1509 AD 989 1815 BC 3000 BC 6 BC

1003 BC AD 1815 AD 1901 1600 BC 2000 BC AD 1066 AD 1005 AD 2014 AD 1966 850 BC 1000 BC

AD 1962 AD 1901 September 22, 2016 Activity #3 Counting Centuries. Complete the following sentences: th 14 1. The year 1321 is in the ________ century. 1968 is in the 20th century. 2. The year ________ 3. The year 1509 is in the ________ 16th century. 4. The year ________ 1066 is in the 11th century. 5. The year 1256 is in the ________ 13th century. th 6. The year ________ is in

the 14 century. 1309 7. The year 899 is in the ________ century. th 9 8. The year ________ is in the 10th century. 987 A century is recorded from 00 to 99. For example, the 16th century is from 1501 to 1600.

When a year ends in 00, like 1600, it is in the 16th century. TOPIC: Time and Types of Evidence OBJECTIVE: 3. Understand the differences between Primary and Secondary evidence. KNOWLEDGE DEVELOPMENT: 1. List the two types of evidence. 2. Match the type of evidence with its description: primary evidence secondary evidence __________________ Secondary evidence evidence or a source that comes AFTER the time that is being studied. Secondary evidence uses Primary evidence. Primary evidence evidence or a source that comes FROM __________________ the time that is being studied. It is the original documents or artefacts from a time that is studied.

TOPIC: Time and Types of Evidence OBJECTIVE: 3. Understand the differences between Primary and Secondary evidence. EVIDENCE ACTIVITIES: 1. Identify which of the following are PRIMARY and which are SECONDARY evidence. a diary from the 16th century A web page A school history book ancient Egyptian papyrus Caenarfon Castle photo of Hitler in 1940 Braveheart, 1995 book by a Roman historian

Primary Evidence Secondary Evidence a diary from the A school 16th century history book ancient Egyptian papyrus A web qtskes.com page Caenarfon

book by a Roman historian Castle photo of Hitler Braveheart, in 1940 1995 TOPIC: Time and Types of Evidence OBJECTIVE: 3. Understand the differences between Primary and Secondary evidence. EVIDENCE ACTIVITIES: 2. Look at the 10 sources. Make a key and highlight each as a primary or secondary source. 1. The Bayeux Tapestry, made before 1077. 2. An account written by William Poitiers in about 1073.

3. An entry in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicles, written in 1067. 4. A television programme about Duke William in 1987. 5. A COPY of the Bayeux Tapestry, made in 1966 to celebrate the 900th anniversary of the Battle of Hastings. 6. A school textbook, written in 1991. 7. A tea towel, containing scenes from the Battle of Hastings. 8. The History of the Kings of England, written by a monk in 1125. 9. Pieces of chain mail from the Battle of Hastings. 10. The bones of a horse, found on the site of the Battle of Hastings in 1980. EVIDENCE ACTIVITIES: 2. Look at the 10 sources on page 4. Make a key and highlight each as a primary or secondary source. Fold and place into your exercise book. 1. The Bayeux Tapestry, made before 1077. 2. An account written by William Poitiers in about 1073. 3. An entry in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicles, written in 1067. 4. A television programme about Duke William in 1987. 5. A COPY of the Bayeux Tapestry, made in 1966 to celebrate the 900th anniversary of the Battle of Hastings. 6. A school textbook, written in 1991. 7. A tea towel, containing scenes from the Battle of Hastings.

8. The History of the Kings of England, written by a monk in 1125. 9. Pieces of chain mail from the Battle of Hastings. 10. The bones of a horse, found on the site of the Battle of Hastings in 1980. Topic: Facts and Opinions Copy these meanings onto the handout and paste them into your exercise book. FACT something known to exist or to have happened; something known to be true OPINION - a personal view, attitude, belief or judgment, but NOT complete certainty / MAYBE not true. BIAS prejudice; favouring one side over another; one point of view ANACHRONISM (an nack row nism) - an object, item or description that is out of place in history. Anachronisms http://www.justinachilli.com/storage/Anachronism01.jpg?__SQUARESPACE_CACHEVERSION=1282612196053 TOPIC: Facts and Opinions OBJECTIVE:5. Identify how anachronisms can change the truth about history. KNOWLEDGE DEVELOPMENT:

2. Why should historians be careful about anachronisms? (4) Historians should be careful about anachronisms for many us know reasons. For example, anachronisms do not help ____________ the truth from the past ___________________________. They can confuse us into believing ________________________. things that are not true Anachronisms can also ______________________________. mislead us about events in history Overall, anachronisms _________________________________________. might be funny but they are not useful information. TOPIC: Facts and Opinions OBJECTIVE: 4. Understand the differences between Fact and Opinion. KNOWLEDGE DEVELOPMENT: Identify which are Facts and which are Opinions. Highlight in two colours. 1. Henry VIII was the son of Henry VII 2. Henry was married to six different wives

FACT 3. Henry was a good king 4. Henry was king of England from 1509 until 1547 5. Henry wasted money on building large ships 6. Henrys first wife was Catherine of Aragon 7. Henry met King Francis I at the Field of the Cloth of Gold 8. Henry was jealous of Francis I 9. Henry liked to hunt when he was younger 10. Henry treated his ministers very harshly 11. Henry gave too much power to Wolsey, his chief minister 12. Three of Henrys children became King or Queens of England OPINION TOPIC: Facts and Opinions OBJECTIVE: 4. Understand the differences between Fact and Opinion. 1. Henry VIII was the son of Henry VII. 2. Henry was married to six different wives. FACT 3. Henry was a good king.

OPINION 4. Henry was king of England from 1509 until 1547. 5. Henry wasted money on building large ships. 6. Henrys first wife was Catherine of Aragon. 7. Henry met King Francis I at the Field of the Cloth of Gold. 8. Henry was jealous of Francis I 9. Henry liked to hunt when he was younger 10. Henry treated his ministers very harshly 11. Henry gave too much power to Wolsey, his chief minister 12. Three of Henrys children became King or Queens of England KD ANSWERS: 1. England changed after the Norman invasion of 1066: (3) A new Norman king took the throne of England Jobs were taken by invaders Land was taken by invaders Buildings were pulled down and replaced A new language was introduced

2. Groups in England before 1066: (5) Vikings from Denmark and Sweden Scots Picts 3. Earldoms in England by 1066: Morcer Edwin Waltheof TOPIC: Introduction to England Before AD 1066 OBJECTIVE: 8. Describe England at the time of the Norman invasion in AD 1066. 5. Lived in England: 1.5 million people, mostly living as farmers in small villages. 6. Wise Up Words: (3) Anglo-Saxon Invaders from Germany who ruled England from AD 500 to about AD 1066

Earldom An area of land that an Earl (noble or Duke) looks after. Vikings Invaders from Denmark, Sweden or Norway. TOPIC: Introduction to England Before AD 1066 KD REVIEW ANSWERS 1: 1. England has a long history. In what year and century did the Romans rule in England end? (1) p. 8 B) AD 410 - 5th century 2. In what year and century did the Vikings start to invade England? (1) p. 8 A) AD 800 - 8th century 3. Where did the Viking invaders come from? (1) p. 8 A) Denmark & Sweden 4. Which invaders came from Germany, Denmark and Holland? (1) p. 8 D) All of the choices are true - Angles - Saxons - Jutes 5. The Scots settled in Scotland, but where did they come from? (1) p. 8 D) Ireland

TOPIC: Introduction to England Before AD 1066 KD REVIEW ANSWERS 2: 6. Who ruled England in AD 1065? (1) p. 9 A) Edward 7. What was the population of England in AD 1066? (1) p. 9 C) 1,500,000 8. How many English towns had populations of more than 1,000? (1) p. 9 D) Fifteen 9. How many English towns had populations of more than 3,000? (1) p. 9 B) Eight 10. How many people out of 100 were rich? (1) p. 10 B) 2 - which is 2% TOPIC: Introduction to England Before AD 1066 KD REVIEW ANSWERS 3: 11. Money, or currency, was divided into what three coins? (1) p. 10 D) All of the choices are true - () - (s) - (d) 12. Pence (d) in a shilling (s): (1) p. 10 B) 12d 13. How many shillings (s) were there in a pound ()? (1) p. 10

D) 20s 14. What is a monk? (1) p. 10 and p. 155 C) a man who worships God 15. What is a chronicle? (1) p. 10 and p. 154 D) a diary of events TOPIC: Claims to the Throne of England in AD 1066 KD ANSWERS: 4. Edward the Confessor ruled England from 1042 until January, 1066. 5. Claims to the English throne in 1066: William of Normandy, France Harold Godwinson of England Harald Hardrada of Norway TOPIC: Claims to the Throne of England in AD 1066 KEY ACTIVITIES: 1. Finish Work #1 (the table) on page 13. Contender

and Country From Why He Should Be King Why He Shouldnt Be King Harold Godwinson England He was English. The Witan wanted him to be king. Before his death, Edward promised Harold. He was brave and respected At one time Harold had been banished.

Harold promised to be loyal to William in 1064. Harald Hardrada Norway He was a tough, feared warrior. He had support from Tostig, Harolds brother. He was not English. He was bloodthirsty and cruel. William of Normandy, France He was promised the throne by his friend, Edward in 1051. He had

the support of some Englishmen, including Harold before 1066. He was not English. He could be cruel if threatened. TOPIC: Claims to the Throne of England in AD 1066 KD ANSWERS: 2. No, Hardrada did not arrive alone. He was supported by 300 Longboats that carried 10,000 Vikings. 3. Yes, Harolds arrival was a surprise. Hardrada could not believe that Harold and his army travelled so far north so quickly. It was early in the morning and some of the Vikings had left their armour (chain mail) at their boats. 4. At first, one brave Viking stopped Harolds men from advancing. He blocked the bridge at Stamford and killed about 40 English soldiers in an hour. TOPIC: Claims to the Throne of England in AD 1066

KD: 1. Finish Work #1 (the table) on page 13. 2. Read pages 14 and 15. Answer Work #1 on page 15. Write these statements in correct chronological order: The Viking warrior blocking the bridge was killed. 3rd The few Vikings still alive escaped in 24 ships. 5th They got shredded to pieces! EAD Hardrada was killed. 4th The Vikings didnt expect to see Harolds army so soon. 1st Many of Hardradas men did not have their armour. 2nd The Battle of Stamford Bridge took place at the village of Stamford Bridge, in England on 25 September 1066. This was shortly after an invading army under King Harald Hardrada from Norway defeated the army of the northern earls Edwin of Mercia and Morcar of Northumbria at the Battle of Fulford. After a long march up to

Stamford Bridge in just four days, King Harold Godwinson of England caught Hardradas force by surprise, which meant that the soldiers were without their armour. After a stubborn battle, the majority of the Norwegians were killed along with Harald Hardrada and Earl Tostig, Harold Godwinsons brother. Although Harold repelled the Norwegian invaders, his victory was short-lived: he was defeated and killed at Hastings less than three weeks later against William the Conqueror. http://www.historylearningsite.co.uk/fileadmin/historyLearningSite/1066.h1.jpg http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Stamford_Bridge TOPIC: The Battle of Hastings 12. Describe the main events at Battle of Hastings. REVIEW KD: A. Who is preparing to fight? William of Normandy and Harold Godwinson of England

B. When will the fight take place? 14 October 1066 C. Where the fight will take place? Senlac Hill, near Hastings D. What types of soldiers fight for each side? Housecarls and the Fyrd fight for Harold and England. Archers, Knights and Norman Foot Soldiers fight for William. Battle of Hastings - Background: Housecarls Fyrd Archers Knights Foot Soldiers Can fire 6 or 7 arrows per minute Archers Mobile army of about 6,000 English Fyrd Well trained and fully armed soldiers on warhorses Knights

FootThe last soldiers who fought on foot with swords and shields Soldiers Harolds best soldiers; they wore helmets, chain mail Housecarls and used battleaxes Match each weapon with its description. Helmet Pitchfork Chain-mail Spear Axe Shield

http://imagecache2.allposters.com/images/pic/MEPOD/10013268~Battle-of-Stamford-Bridge-Harald-Godwinson-Posters.jpg TOPIC: The Battle of Hastings KD ANSWERS: 1. King Harold received bad news after he defeated Hardrada at the Battle of Stamford Bridge. Harold had to travel 250 miles to meet William of Normandy. 2. Williams army arrived at Pevensey Bay. 3. The Normans learned a very important lesson. They are determined NOT to be caught unprepared like Hardrada. They kept their armour and weapons with them at all times. 4. The steep hill was called Senlac Hill, which in Norman French means Lake of Blood. It was named by the Normans because they eventually win the battle and because so much blood was spilt during the fighting. 5. The Battle of Hastings began on 14 October AD 1066, about 9:30 am. TOPIC: William Conquers England OBJECTIVE: 12. Explain why it was difficult for William to control England.

KNOWLEDGE DEVELOPMENT: 1. What are three problems William faced after his victory at Hastings? (3) p. 24 TOPIC: William Conquers England OBJECTIVE: 12. Explain why it was difficult for William to control England. TOPIC: William Conquers England OBJECTIVE: 12. Explain why it was difficult for William to control England. KD ANSWERS: 1. Three problems William faced after Hastings: (3) p. 24 He knew the English wanted to get rid of him soon. He killed their English King and they wanted revenge. There was a chance that Vikings from Norway and Denmark might join angry Englishmen in the north. Some of Harolds army survived and stayed in London to guard it. There was a fort in Dover with tough and angry Englishmen soldiers. William had to defeat them on his way to London. Williams army was very tired. TOPIC: William Conquers England

OBJECTIVE: 13. Explain why it was difficult for William to control England. KD: 5. How long did it take William to arrive in London? (1) p. 26 6. When was William crowned King of England? (1) p. 26 KD Answers: 5. It took William two-and-a-half months to arrive in London. p. 26 6. William was crowned King of England on Christmas day, December 25, 1066. TOPIC: William Conquers England OBJECTIVE: 14. Describe the steps William took to control England. SKILL DEVELOPMENT: 1. Read source F on page 26. Williams men were warmly welcomed in the north of England. Do you agree or disagree? Explain (QTS & QWS). (5) SOURCE F William gave Northumberland to Earl Robert (his friend) but the people of Durham massacred Robert and 900 of his soldiers. Prince Edgar and the rebels came to York and the people of the city joined them ... The Vikings came from Denmark with 240 ships and joined up with the English. With a huge and joyful army they stormed York and killed hundreds of Williams men,

burned the castle and captured lots of treasure. Rebellion in the North from the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle. 1. Williams men were warmly welcomed in the north of England. Do you agree or disagree? Explain (QTS - Quote to support and QWS). (5) ANSWER STRUCTURE: I _____________ agree with the statement. Williams men were _______________ warmly welcomed. According to source F it says, _________________________ _________________. In addition, it also says, __________________________. Both of these examples suggest Williams men were v _ _ _ _ _ s of the English, which leads me to think that his men were ______________________. TOPIC: William Conquers England OBJECTIVE: 14. Describe the steps William took to control England. 2. According to sources G and H, how did William and his soldiers treat the people in northern England? QTS and QWS. (5) TOPIC: William Conquers England OBJECTIVE: 14. Describe the steps William took to control England. TOPIC: Bias and QTS Practice OBJECTIVES: 1. Identify Bias

and 2. Argue with QTS. KD ANSWERS: 2. According to sources G and H, how did William and his soldiers treat the people in northern England? QTS and QWS. (5) According to Sources G and H William and his soldiers treated the people of northern England _____________. Both Sources give examples of William _______________________. For example, Source G says, _________________________, and Source H says, _______________________________. Furthermore, Source G also says, ______________________, and H mentions, ______________________. Overall, the Sources portray William as ___________________. TOPIC: William Conquers England OBJECTIVE: 14. Describe the steps William took to control England. 3. What was Williams revenge known as? (1) p. 26 ANSWER:

Williams revenge was known as the Harrying of the North. William was angry that his friend, Earl Robert and 900 soldiers were massacred (killed without mercy) by English people in York. The Battle of Hastings - ESSAY WRITING STRUCTURE: Why did William win the Battle of Hastings? (8 marks) Make sure to use quotes to support why William won, and why Harold lost. William won the Battle of Hastings for many _________. For example, Source ____ says, ___________. In addition, Source ____ states Harold, ___________. Furthermore, Source ___ explains _________________. Moreover, William _________________________. All of these examples suggest that William won the Battle because he was __________________________.

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