MAKING COPY SHINE WITH EDITING (Lessons 4-7) Sabrina

MAKING COPY SHINE WITH EDITING (Lessons 4-7) Sabrina

MAKING COPY SHINE WITH EDITING (Lessons 4-7) Sabrina Schmitz, CJE, Walsworth Yearbooks walsworthyearbooks.com/yearbooksuite Lesson 4: Quotes and Transitions Objectives In this lesson you will: Understand how to edit to make smooth transitions between paragraphs to further the story Learn to recognize quotes that add emotion to the story, and remove or

paraphrase quotes that do not Understand how to edit copy so the transitions and quotes are not just repeated in the copy walsworthyearbooks.com/yearbooksuite Lesson 4: Quotes and Transitions Transitions and quotes are the meat and potatoes of a story. They are the main event that holds the story together and moves the message along. However, editing this part of a story can be tricky since its success relies heavily on the interview and the information the

reporter gathered prior to writing. But no matter the overall quality of the piece, there are a few concrete items to look for when editing the body portion of a story. walsworthyearbooks.com/yearbooksuite Handling Transitions The When Asked Transition: Be aware of the transition that attempts to transcribe the interview. EXAMPLE: When asked how he felt about collecting items for the homeless, Trevor Williams said he was humbled by it all and was grateful for the opportunity to help. Better: Collecting items for those less fortunate humbled Trevor Williams

and left him feeling grateful for his station in life. walsworthyearbooks.com/yearbooksuite Handling Transitions The Repeat Transition: Be aware of the transition that repeats the same information presented in the quote. EXAMPLE: Students say they are looking forward to the arrival of the new principal. Im really looking forward to the new principal arriving, Wayne Scott said. Better: Excitement arose among students such as Wayne Scott at the thought of fresh leadership on campus. Im really looking forward to the

new principal arriving, Scott said. walsworthyearbooks.com/yearbooksuite walsworthyearbooks.com/yearbooksuite Handling Quotes The Fact Quote: Be aware of quotes that convey facts instead of emotion or important, storytelling information. When you see them, ask the reporter if he possibly got a better quote during the interviewing process. EXAMPLE: The debate team practices every Wednesday after school in the cafeteria, Joshua Lyman said. Better: Debate practices get so heated that sometimes we forget that we

are all on the same team and that it is just practice. Sometimes we have to take a few minutes to cool off when things get intense, Joshua Lyman said. walsworthyearbooks.com/yearbooksuite Handling Quotes The Quote with Attribution: Unless there is a clear and specific reason, all quotes should be attributed with the verb said. EXAMPLE: I cant believe we are an A school for the third year in a row, Principal Jessica Schultz exclaimed. Better: I cant believe we are an A school for the third year in a row, Principal Jessica Schultz said.

walsworthyearbooks.com/yearbooksuite Handling Quotes The Quote with Minor Edits: Quotes can be edited, but rarely. Some instances will allow you to edit poor grammar as long as it does not affect the integrity of the quote. All vocalized pauses should be edited out of quotes as well. These include phrases such as ya know and hmmm. EXAMPLE: Ummmm. I thought the competition was uh fair ya knowfor the most part, Samuel Powers said. Better: I thought the competition was fair for the most part, Samuel Powers said.

walsworthyearbooks.com/yearbooksuite Handling Quotes The Nothing Quote: Be aware of the quote that conveys no information and fails to further the story. EXAMPLE: I took art because I like painting, Jack Kelly said. Better: I was inspired by my mom to paint. She always took me to parks to paint nature scenes since I was little, and ever since then I couldnt put the brush down, Jack Kelly said. walsworthyearbooks.com/yearbooksuite

Lesson 4 Activity: Working with transitions and quotes Identify the transition and quote problems in the following story. Edit the story, fixing the problems. walsworthyearbooks.com/yearbooksuite Lesson 4 Activity: Working with transitions and quotes Sifting through racks of clothing at local thrift stores in their spare time paired with their desire to make their own apparel led to the creation of What Dress Code?, a clothing line by Nikole Passarella and Alexandra Kerns.

I like doing DIY (do-it-yourself) stuff because I like making things, Passarella said. When asked how she felt about creating a customer base, Kerns believed that high school students make the best clients. I wanted to create my own fashion line because all high school students dress the same, and I wanted to help change that, Kerns said. Passarella thought that the clothing line was successful. walsworthyearbooks.com/yearbooksuite Lesson 4 Activity: Working with transitions and quotes I think that the line has been successful in the sense that people are really

interested in what we do, Passarella commented. This new endeavor forced Kerns to balance her fashion line with her other responsibilities. I work 15 hours a week and have approximately three hours of homework a night, Kerns said. What Dress Code? saw success and its founders continued to expand their products to reach a broader audience. walsworthyearbooks.com/yearbooksuite Lesson 5: Copy-editing marks Objective In this lesson you will: Learn the most-used copy-editing marks

walsworthyearbooks.com/yearbooksuite Lesson 5: Copy-editing marks If you have ever tried to communicate with someone who spoke a different language, you understand how frustrating that process can be. No matter how good the message is, if youre not speaking the same language, you cant get the message across effectively. Copy-editing marks are the universal language of editing. If both the writer and editor commit these marks to memory, they will be able to clearly communicate so the corrections to a story can be

made with ease. walsworthyearbooks.com/yearbooksuite Copy-editing marks Insert a comma Leave as originally written Insert quotation marks or apostrophes Separate run together words Lowercase Uppercase Do the opposite Transpose letters or words

walsworthyearbooks.com/yearbooksuite Copy-editing marks Delete letters, words or phrases not needed Delete a letter in the middle of a word and close Delete a letter at the beginning or end of a word, or punctuation mark Insert a letter or word Emphasize a penciled-in period Emphasize a paragraph or begin a paragraph Insert hyphen walsworthyearbooks.com/yearbooksuite

Copy-editing marks Insert a dash End of story walsworthyearbooks.com/yearbooksuite Lesson 5 Activity: Make your mark Number your paper 1- 17. Write down the correct editing mark. 1. 2. 3.

4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16.

17. Insert a comma Leave as originally written Insert quotations marks or apostrophes Separate run together words Lowercase Uppercase Do the opposite Transpose letters or words Delete letters, words or phrases not needed Delete a letter in the middle of a word and close Delete a letter at the beginning or end of a word, or a punctuation mark

Insert a letter or word Emphasize a penciled-in period Emphasize a paragraph or begin a paragraph Insert hyphen Insert a dash Either of these marks says the end of story walsworthyearbooks.com/yearbooksuite Lesson 6: AP Style Rules Objectives In this lesson you will: Learn some of the more frequently used Associated Press style rules Practice using copy-editing marks

walsworthyearbooks.com/yearbooksuite Lesson 6: AP Style Rules Consider what school would be like without any rules. Sounds like a blast, right? It might be fun for a little while, but it wouldnt be long before things took a turn for the worst. At best, students would be out of control and chaotic. Whether we like to admit it or not, we all appreciate some rules. Rules keep life functioning smoothly and consistently so we always know what to expect from not just ourselves, but from others as

well. walsworthyearbooks.com/yearbooksuite Lesson 6: AP Style Rules The Associated Press Stylebook is a rulebook for journalistic style. It sets forth style guidelines that help keep copy concise and consistent. Abiding by the AP Style rules eliminates confusion for the reader as they move through a large publication. Though the voice of the writer may change as readers jump from story to story, the rules keep the style consistent and orderly so it is easier for the

reader to process. walsworthyearbooks.com/yearbooksuite AP Style Rules NUMBERS Spell out numbers less than 10, including fractions less than one. Spell out first through ninth when they indicate a sequence in time or location.

I slid into second base. Look for the third house on the left. Spell out any number, except a year, that starts a sentence. Spell out casual expressions of numbers. A picture is worth a thousand words.

Spell out the word percent. Use figures with percentages. I used 25 percent of my money. Always use the numeral for dates with no st, nd, rd or th. The homecoming game is Friday, Nov. 6, at the stadium. Always use $ and the numeral unless there is no numeral or it is a casual reference. I have $25 in my pocket.

There were millions of dollars in that car. walsworthyearbooks.com/yearbooksuite AP Style Rules TITLES Lowercase all titles not used before a name. Barack Obama, president Roy Blunt, senator Lowercase all titles that are primarily job descriptions. farmer teacher movie star

Capitalize all formal titles when used before a name. President Barack Obama walsworthyearbooks.com/yearbooksuite AP Style Rules ABBREVIATIONS Abbreviate titles when used before names. Sen. Mike Smith Gov. Mike Smith Abbreviate avenue, street and boulevard in numbered addresses only. 5555 Smith Blvd. I live on Smith Boulevard.

Abbreviate months with more than five letters when used with a date. Dec. 15 is Mr. Smiths birthday. December is the best month ever. walsworthyearbooks.com/yearbooksuite Lesson 6, Activity 1: AP Stylebook Treasure Hunt The following sentences have a mistake in bold. Using copy-editing marks, correct the sentences according to the rule found in the AP Stylebook. If you have a stylebook, write the page number where you found the rule. 1. Her birthday was April 1st. 2. Lunch is over at 1:00 PM.

3. Mrs. Smith was the head of the History Department and English Department. 4. The kids will graduate in Dec. 2006. 5. Mike Alstott is the Full Back for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. 6. The school is located in New Port Richey, Florida. 7. Miss Jones had a tutoring session during lunch yesterday. 8. The teacher asked for 8 volunteers to show their project. 9. PHCC is a good school to attend if youd like to earn an Associates Degree. walsworthyearbooks.com/yearbooksuite Lesson 6, Activity 1: AP Stylebook Treasure Hunt

10. 11. 12. 13. 14. The student body increased by over 200 students. The Mustangs beat the Rams 21 to 20 at last nights game. The staff had an extra day off for labor day falling on a Monday. Night school was canceled on Tue. and Wed. nights this week. It is important to know proper punctuation (like how to use parentheses.) 15. You can find a lot of information on the web about war.

16. My favorite time of the year is the Fall. 17. New Years Day is exciting; you have a fresh start for the New Year. 18. This information should just stay among the two of us. 19. I vacation biannually; I save up to go on a longer trip every two years. 20. I prefer to attend the pre-season football games so I can observe all the new players. walsworthyearbooks.com/yearbooksuite Lesson 6, Activity 2: Using AP Style Correct this passage to read accurately according to the Associated Press style rules. Use the appropriate copy-editing marks.

BAN MAY GO BEYOND PAJAMAS the fate of the most emotionally issue charged on Student Councils Nov. Ballot could hinge on a question of dress code. Would banning pajama day during homecoming week threaten participation for 100s of students who depend on this day to earn spirit points for their class? Passage of similarly worded dress-up day bans at neighboring schools have thrust this issue to the front of the student council agenda. So far, one schools Student Council has ruled that the pajama day ban prevented students from dressing inappropriately, however other students feel that this ban will hurt participation in homecoming week events walsworthyearbooks.com/yearbooksuite

Lesson 6, Activity 3: Using AP Style and Copy-editing Marks Use copy-editing marks to correct the AP style errors in the sentences below. 1. The software costs four hundred and twenty-five dollars. 2. The President dedicated Mount Rushmore. 3. John Glenn, Astronaut and United States Senator, almost ran for President of the United States. 4. Meredith McNulty, English and History Teacher, planned a trip to New York. 5. The Sophomore class and the Juniors got into an epic battle during powder puff. 6. The society will award cash prizes for the top three entries: $40 for 1st

place, thirty dollars for second place, and twenty dollars for 3rd place. walsworthyearbooks.com/yearbooksuite Lesson 6, Activity 3: Using AP Style and Copy-editing Marks (continued) Use copy-editing marks to correct the AP style errors in the sentences below. 7. American History will not be taught next year, but political science will be. 8. Blues Brothers 2000 has a PG 13 rating and is showing at Westport cinema. 9. I had a bag of chips and a coca-cola for lunch. 10. This is the first District title for the Pioneers in over twenty-five years.

11. Composer and Orchestra Leader Aaron Copland composed multiple songs. 12. The U.S. $ is weak, and that is part of the reason the national debt is into $1,000,000s of dollars. walsworthyearbooks.com/yearbooksuite Lesson 7: The Editing Process Objective In this lesson you will: Learn some editing best practices and techniques to help you edit stories walsworthyearbooks.com/yearbooksuite

Lesson 7: The Editing Process Now that you are comfortable with editing the content of a story, it is time to address the copy-editing process. With so many stories being submitted at various times by a variety of writers, an organizational structure for editing needs to be in place. Without it, writers can be confused by mixed messages from editors, printed drafts of stories can be lost, and the quality of the story will suffer. walsworthyearbooks.com/yearbooksuite Write hot, edit cold Writing can be a taxing activity. Reporters should write freely while thoughts are flowing and

ideas are clear. They can save the editing process for later. However, this does not mean to write hot and then pass along your rough work for some editor to trudge through. A fresh set of eyes is important, but since it is your piece and you know it best, self-editing is a practice that cannot be sacrificed in the name of saving some time. walsworthyearbooks.com/yearbooksuite Write hot, edit cold When you reach a resting point in your writing, step away from the

story for a while. It could for be for an hour or a day, but give yourself some space so that you can approach editing the piece with a fresh perspective. Then return to your story with a keen, objective editing eye. Follow the same process for your own story that you would if editing someone elses work. Examine the story for the purpose of both subjective and objective editing. walsworthyearbooks.com/yearbooksuite Editing best practices

With so many different areas of writing that must be edited, it is imperative that each story is read multiple times. Each time you read through a story, look for something different. Use the pattern below as a guideline. o Read once for content. o Read once for organization. o Read once for language. walsworthyearbooks.com/yearbooksuite Editing best practices It is amazing the errors in content and language that are uncovered simply

from reading something aloud. Our voices tend to find the errors and inaccuracies that our minds glaze over. Read to your friends, your editors, your parents, your pets anyone who will listen. If all else fails, read it out loud to yourself. As you find errors, pause to make the corrections. walsworthyearbooks.com/yearbooksuite Editing best practices Instead of reading through your story multiple times looking for different areas of concern, allow a group of peers to help you go through the editing process. Assign one person to listen for content, one to listen for

organization, and one to listen for language. Your editing audience can write comments on a feedback form, like the one below, as you read, or you can provide a copy of your story to each group member that they can use to provide feedback. walsworthyearbooks.com/yearbooksuite Editing best practices Sometimes it is not what you are reading for, but how you are reading that will make the difference. The best way to find small errors, such as spelling, capitalization and punctuation, is to read the story like a kindergartner reads their first book

painstakingly slow. Reading the story slowly and out loud is even better. Furthermore, reading the story backwards allows you to see each word as an individual entity, which makes spelling errors easier to spot. walsworthyearbooks.com/yearbooksuite Editing best practices Avoid the temptation to mark up someones story and hand it back to him or her without ever having a discussion. It is rare that major changes to a story can be communicated clearly with a few comments in the margins of the story.

Take time to sit down and talk with the writer. Explain what you think the revision needs. Have them explain back to you what needs to be done to make sure the writer understands and agrees. walsworthyearbooks.com/yearbooksuite walsworthyearbooks.com/yearbooksuite Editing best practices Even when the criticism you are providing is constructive, a lot of bad news can really discourage a writer. To help soften the blow, use the criticism sandwich method: positive negative positive

Always begin with a positive comment. Tell the writer something you liked about their story or something they did well. Then move to the areas that need improvement. Provide specific, detailed feedback regarding the problem areas of their story. Then close the conversation with another positive comment. This method will help motivate the writer and keep him or her from feeling overwhelmed and under-appreciated. walsworthyearbooks.com/yearbooksuite Editing best practices Editors can often overstep their boundaries and rewrite large portions of a reporters work. Whereas the editors intentions may be altruistic, this act

only serves to alienate the reporter. Writers are likely to wonder why they poured their heart and soul into a piece just to have their work removed and replaced by someone elses. Furthermore, the reporter doesnt learn in this process. They cannot recognize their shortcomings and work to improve them if they are robbed of the opportunity. Everyone will benefit in the end if editors edit the story and show the writer how to improve. walsworthyearbooks.com/yearbooksuite Editing best practices To make sure every story is edited thoroughly, a solid editing process should

be in place. Then stick with it. A system that works for your staff will help keep staffers and editors accountable and communicating clearly. walsworthyearbooks.com/yearbooksuite walsworthyearbooks.com/yearbooksuite Editing best practices (continued) Example: 1. Staffer writes first draft of story 2. Self-edit 3. Peer-edit

4. First draft submitted to editor; editor makes corrections and returns to staffer 5. Staffer makes corrections and submits revised draft to editor again 6. Editor makes corrections and then passes on to the editor-in-chief 7. Editor-in-chief makes corrections and returns to staffer 8. Staffer makes final corrections and submits final draft to editor 9. Editor gives final approval and passes to editor-in-chief 10. Editor-in-chief gives final approval and passes to adviser Create your own flow chart system for your staff. walsworthyearbooks.com/yearbooksuite Making Copy Shine with Editing

To help with editing, use a checklist to help you review each story. Heres an example: walsworthyearbooks.com/yearbooksuite Lesson 7 Activity: Edit a story Select a story written for the yearbook and edit it using the editing process and checklist. Note on a piece of paper the changes you would make and attach them to the story, or make them on the story. walsworthyearbooks.com/yearbooksuite

This is the end of the presentation. Proceed for the answers to activities. walsworthyearbooks.com/yearbooksuite Working with transitions and quotes walsworthyearbooks.com/yearbooksuite walsworthyearbooks.com/yearbooksuite AP Stylebook Treasure Hunt

walsworthyearbooks.com/yearbooksuite Using AP Style and copyediting marks walsworthyearbooks.com/yearbooksuite

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