Tribal 121 Programs within the State of Oklahoma

Tribal 121 Programs within the State of Oklahoma

Tribal 121 Programs within the State of Oklahoma Apache Nation Cherokee Nation Cheyenne and Arapaho Chickasaw Nation Choctaw Nation Delaware Nation Iowa Nation Muscogee (Creek) Nation Prepared by Del Wade Walters Muscogee (Creek) Nation Vocational Rehabilitation [email protected] History of the American Indian Vocational Rehabilitation Program This section was written by Carleen Anderson, Rehabilitation Services Administration Region X Note: Footnotes are denoted by the use of square brackets, [] American Indian Vocational Rehabilitation Programs (AIVRP) have an abbreviated history but a long story of challenges to service provision. Social service systems today and historically have grappled with the uniqueness of the American Indian communities. Most social service staff don't know there are over 339 federally recognized tribes and 227 federally recognized Native entities in Alaska [1] with about 60 [2] state recognized tribes in the country. Often tribes have their own

distinct culture and language further complicating attempts to serve Indian people. About 250 native languages are still spoken today. [3] There have been efforts to address the challenges of service provision. In 1947, the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation and the Bureau of Indian Affairs signed a Cooperative Relationship Memorandum 21 in (revised 4/16/1962) resolving to focus their efforts to serve Indians with disabilities. The report notes "there is a very limited chronicle of integration of vocational rehabilitation services by the Tribal or Federal service agencies". Little or no information exists to report the results of this effort. A 1978 Annual Report of the Department of Education-Rehabilitation Services Administration in an analysis of Native Americans in the Vocational Rehabilitation Program provided the following summary: "The greatest problems that face VR in the effort to improve services to Native Americans are ones that relate more to the potential client's status as an American Indian than to disability status. The Indian population on reservations, including the disabled population, is not conveniently located for easy participation in general Federal and State programs; they are usually dispersed in large rural areas. If there is a single, important step that RSA should consider in order to improve VR services to Native Americans, that step is developing ways to take VR to the reservation Indians. It is not likely that they will or even can come to VR in significant numbers." "The American Indian and Alaska Native people are the most underserved, misrepresented, and unknown population that require assistance in achieving employment and independence" [4] captures the state of vocational rehabilitation services to American Indians with disabilities until the 1980's. American Indians have one of the highest disability profiles in the country yet have been identified as unserved or underserved by state vocational rehabilitation (VR) systems. Numerous reports have addressed the health condition of American Indian people in the country. One report, Trends in Indian Health - 1997, related that the leading cause of death for American Indians and Alaska Natives residing in the IHS service area (1992-1994) was diseases of the heart. Cancer is the second leading cause of death among American Indians and

Alaska Natives over the age of 45. Comparisons of age-adjusted death rates for American Indians with the U.S. all races population in 1993 depict notably higher incidence (adjusted for miscoding of Indian race on death certificates) as follows: [5] Alcoholism - 579% greater Tuberculosis - 475% greater Diabetes Mellitus - 231% greater Accidents - 212% greater Suicide - 70% greater Pneumonia and influenza - 61% greater Homicide - 41% greater In 1975, Arizona Division of Vocational Rehabilitation funded a three year establishment grant to the Navajo Nation to begin serving persons with disabilities living on the Navajo Indian Reservation area of the state. In 1978 a tri-state grant entered into by the state vocational rehabilitation agencies in Arizona, New Mexico, and Utah provided funds to Navajo to continue serving cases opened during the 1975-1978 period. By 1978, Congress had written in Section 130 under Title I in the Rehabilitation Act which provided for American Indians projects to serve Indian people on reservations. There, however, wasn't a mechanism identified to fund the programs. The Navajo Nation spearheaded a movement to include a funding mandate to the Act which was ultimately accomplished in about 1983. The Navajo Nation applied for and received the initial grant in the amount of $650,000 and was the only project to provide vocational rehabilitation services to American Indians with disabilities until about 1985. More than forty years after the 1947 memorandum, federal funds became available for the development of vocational rehabilitation (VR) programs in Indian Country. The Navajo Nation's successful endeavor paved the way for American Indian vocational rehabilitation programs and

functioned as the model for service provision to American Indians with disabilities. Support that included Native people who were from the community served, who knew the language, community, and resources. In about 1985 the Northern Cheyenne and Chippewa-Cree Tribes in Montana applied for and were funded under the Rehabilitation Act legislation. Today, Indian issues that were challenges in 1978 - nearly 25 years ago - are still prevalent today: poverty, rural and remote communities, high unemployment rates (some tribes experience 50% plus), high rates of disabling conditions: cancer, heart disease, substance abuse, specific learning disabilities, and traumatic brain injuries and off-reservation service agencies are still trying to understand the distinct cultures within tribal communities. From the seeds planted by a few in 1978, the American Indian Vocational Rehabilitation projects have grown to 67 programs located in 23 states in 2002. Funding increased from $650,000 in 1981 to $23,998,000 today. AIVRP's providing services on or near their reservation communities (as determined by the tribes) successfully rehabilitated 1,088 American Indians with disabilities in FY 2001. Those services are often provided by American Indian people from the community who understand the culture, speak the language, and know the resources. Tribal programs adhere to the Rehabilitation Act in establishing eligibility (which includes serving only American Indians who are recognized as members of a tribe) and provide assistance comparable to the State VR system under an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE). Tribal VRP's provide culturally-relevant supports to American Indians with disabilities often coupling those services with Indian Health Services, Bureau of Indian Affairs, and Tribal services. Because of the 1998 Amendments to the Rehabilitation Act, cooperative agreements are required between states and Tribal VRP's. Each agency is responsible for establishment of eligibility and IPE components but each agency can blend its service to best meet the needs of the consumer. This collaborative assistance frequently results in both agencies claiming successful rehabilitations when an American Indian with disabilities is employed for 90 days. Footnotes:

Federal Register, 1977 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Administration for Native Americans web site, 1/23/2001 Rehabilitation and American Indians with Disabilities: A Handbook for Administrators, Practitioners, and Researchers, C.A. Marshall, Ph.D., C.R.C., Editor, AIRRTC, 2002, page 28, American Indians: An Overview of Factors Influencing Health Care, Disability, and Service Delivery, Priscilla Lansing Sanderson, Author. Rehabilitation and American Indians with Disabilities: A Handbook for Administrators, Practitioners, and Researchers, C.A. Marshall, Ph.D., C.R.C., Editor, AIRRTC, 2001, page Xiii, Preface 1997 Trends in Indian Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Indian Health Services, Office of Public Health, p.6 References: New Perspectives for Handicapped Indian Individuals, a White Paper issued by the Department of Health and Human Services, Indian Children's Program in the 1980's A Study of the Special Problems and Needs of American Indians with Handicaps Both On and Off the Reservation, Vol. I, Native American Research and Training Center, NAU, 1987 American Indians/Alaska Natives & Cancer, Intercultural Cancer Council, Various documents prepared by Richard W. Corbridge, Assistant Commissioner, Region X RSA Rehabilitation and American Indians with Disabilities: A Handbook for Administrators, Practitioners, and Researchers, C. A. Marshall, Ph.D., C.R.C., Editor, AIRRTC, 2001, page Xiii, Preface Federal Register, 1997 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Administration for Native Americans web site, 1/23/2001

Rehabilitation and American Indians with Disabilities: A Handbook for Administrators, Practitioners, and Researchers, C. A. Marshall, Ph.D., C.R.C., Editor, AIRRTC, 2001, page 28, American Indians: An Overview of Factors Influencing Health Care, Disability, and Service Delivery, Priscilla Lansing Sanderson, Author. 1997 Trends in Indian Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Indian Health Services, Office of Public Health Used with Permission of the Author. 8/21/03 * History of Tribal Vocational Rehabilitation in Oklahoma In 1992 the Cherokee Nation and Apache Tribe established a Tribal Vocational Rehabilitation Program (TVR) In 1993 the Choctaw Nation establish TVR Program In 1994 the Iowa Tribe establish TVR Program In 1996 the Chickasaw Nation establish TVR Program In 1997 the Cheyenne and Arapaho establish TVR Program In 1998 the Muscogee (Creek) Nation and the Western Delaware Nation establish TVR Program Eligibility Criteria Must be a member of a Federally recognized tribe residing within the tribes jurisdictional area Must have a mental or physical disability that results in substantial impediment to employment.

a Must be able to benefit in terms of employment outcome from VR services. Must require VR services to prepare for, enter in, or retain gainful employment. * SSI/SSDI and Eligibility for VR Services The Act stipulates that an individual that has a disability and is an SSI/SSDI recipient under the provisions of the Social Security Act, is presumed to meet eligibility criteria, and is therefore eligible for VR services, provided that: The individual intends to achieve an employment outcome, and The individual is capable of achieving an employment outcome. * Federal Regulations Mandate Three and only three goals of Vocational Rehabilitation.

Employment Employment Employment * What is Employment? Entering or retaining full-time or, if appropriate, part-time competitive employment in the integrated labor market; It could also mean supported employment where the individual is competitively employed in an integrated setting but requires on-going support services, due to the nature and significance of their impairment. Other vocational outcomes include work that is consistent with the individuals strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interests, and informed choice.

* Types of case closures Employed full-time in the integrated labor market Employed part-time in the integrated labor market Satisfying a vocational outcome of Supported Employment Satisfying a vocational outcome of self-employment, telecommuting, or business ownership All other types of employment (e.g., subsistence activities, unpaid work on family farm or business, employment in a nonintegrated site, or for less than minimum wage. * Types of Services provided by Tribal VR Programs: Assessment for determining eligibility Assessment for determining vocational rehabilitation needs. Vocational Rehabilitation Counseling and Guidance. Recruitment and training services to provide new employment opportunities in the field of rehabilitation, health, welfare, public safety, law enforcement, and other appropriate public service employment.

Job search and placement assistance and job retention services. Referral Services Supported employment services. Physical and Mental restoration Services. Personal assistance services. Vocational and other training services. Maintenance Post-employment services. Occupational licenses, tools, equipment, initial stock and supplies. Transportation Rehabilitation technology. Vocational rehabilitation Services to family members of an applicant or eligible individual if necessary to enable eligible individual to achieve an employment outcome.

Interpreter services for individual who are deaf And tactile interpreting services for indivduals who are deaf-blind. Reader services, rehabilitation teaching services, and orientation and mobility services for individuals who are blind. * Transition services Other goods and services determined necessary for the individual with a disability to achieve an employment outcome. the above is in accordance with 34 CFR 361.48 Scope of vocational rehabilitation services for individuals with disabilities. Check with tribal program to see what services individual program offers. Funding: Funding for tribal 121 program is determined by the commissioner of RSA with a maximum of 1.25% of the overall RSA budget. For FY 2002 the 121 programs were awarded 1.01% of the RSA budget. The average grant award is between $350,000 - $500,000 per year. This means for every one dollar the state of Oklahoma receives from

RSA the tribal unit received just over one cent. Funding is provided by RSA at a rate of 90% federal with a 10% tribal match, no DRS funds are provided to the tribal program. How Services are Provided Partnerships with other agencies * DRS Department of Rehab Services IHS Indian Health Service Other State agencies 121 Tribal VR Program Tribal Health Service Tribal Programs

Private Organizations Federal Agencies 121 Programs within the State of Oklahoma Apache Nation VR Cherokee Nation VR Cheyenne and Arapaho VR Chickasaw Nation VR Choctaw Nation VR Delaware Nation VR Iowa Nation VR Muscogee (Creek) Nation VR Not served by a 121 program * Counties with more than one color are served by more than one 121 program. Call the program to define the boundaries. Anadarko

Apache Tribal VR Program Address: Telephone Number: P.O. Box 1220 1-405-247-7494 Anadarko, OK 73005 Fax Number: * 1-405-247-9872 Counties served by the Apache Nation VR 1. Caddo * 2. Comanche 3. Cotton

4. Grady * and ** 5. Jackson 6. Kiowa ** 7. Tillman * Part of County served by Chickasaw Nation VR ** Part of County served by Delaware Nation VR Tahlequah Cherokee Tribal VR Program Address: Telephone Number: P.O. Box 948 1-918-458-4415 Tahlequah, OK 74465

Fax Number: 1-918-458-4482 * Counties served by the Cherokee Nation VR 1. Adair 2. Cherokee 3. Craig 4. Delaware 5. Mayes * 6. McIntosh * 7. Muskogee * 8. Nowata

9. Ottawa 10. Rogers * 11. Sequoyah 12. Tulsa * 13. Wagoner * 14. Washington * Part of County served by Creek Nation VR Concho Cheyenne & Arapaho Tribal VR Program Address: Telephone Number: P.O. Box 38

1-405-422-1178 Concho, OK 73022 * Fax Number: 1-405-422-7618 Counties served by the Cheyenne and Arapaho Nation VR 1. Beckham 2. Blaine * 4. Custer 5. Dewey 7. Kingfisher 8. Major 10. Washita 11. Woodward * Part of County served by Delaware Nation VR 3. Canadian 6. Ellis

9. Roger Mills Ada Chickasaw Tribal VR Program Address: Telephone Number: 222 South Mississippi 1-580-436-0553 Ada, OK 74820 * Fax Number: 1-580-436-0830 Counties served by the Chickasaw Nation VR 1. Bryan *

2. Carter 4. Garvin 5. Grady * and ** 7. Johnston 8. Love 10. McClain ** 11. Murray 13. Stephens * Part of County served by Choctaw Nation VR ** Part of County served by Delaware Nation VR 3. Coal * 6. Jefferson 9. Marshall 12. Pontotoc Hugo Choctaw Nation Tribal VR Program Address: Telephone Number:

P.O. Box 88 1-580-326-8304 Hugo, OK 74743 Fax Number: 1-580-326-2410 Counties served by the Choctaw Nation VR 1. Atoka 2. Bryan * 4. Coal * 5. Haskell 7. LeFlore 8. McCurtain 10. Pushmataha 11. Hughes ** * Part of County served by Chickasaw Nation VR ** Part of County served by Creek Nation VR 3. Choctaw 6. Latimer

9. Pittsburg * Oklahoma City Delaware Nation Tribal VR Program Address: Telephone Number: 7249 S. Western, Suite 104 1-405-632-3749 Oklahoma City, OK 73139 Fax Number: 1-405-632-9753 Counties served by the Delaware Nation VR 1. Blaine * 4. Grady ** and *** 7. McLain ***

2. Caddo ** 5. Kiowa ** 8. Oklahoma 3. Cleveland 6. Logan **** * Part of County served by Cheyenne and Arapaho Nation VR ** Part of County served by Apache Nation VR *** Part of County served by Chickasaw Nation VR **** Part of County served by Iowa Nation VR * Perkins Iowa Nation Tribal VR Program Address: Telephone Number: R.R. 1, Box 721

1-405-547-5721 Perkins, OK 74059 Fax Number: * 1-405-547-1090 Counties served by the Iowa Nation VR 1. Kay 4. Noble 7. Pottawatomie 2. Lincoln 5. Pawnee * Part of County served by Delaware Nation VR 3. Logan * 6. Payne Okemah

Muscogee (Creek) Nation Tribal VR Program Address: Telephone Number: 401 S. Woody Guthrie 1-918-623-1197 Okemah, OK 74859 Fax Number: * 1-918-623-2796 Counties served by the MCNVRP 1. Creek 4. McIntosh * 7. Okmulgee 10. Tulsa *

2. Hughes 5. Muskogee * 8. Rogers * 11. Wagoner * * Part of County served by Cherokee Nation VR ** Part of County not served by 121 Program. 3. Mayes * 6. Okfuskee 9. Seminole ** Counties not served by a 121 VR Program Counties not served by a 121 Program 1. Alfalfa 2. Beaver 3. Cimarron 4. Garfield 5. Grant 6. Greer 7. Harman

8. Harper 9. Osage 10. Ottawa * 11. Seminole ** 12.Texas * * Part of County served by Cherokee Nation VR ** Part of County served by Creek Nation VR VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION SERVICE PROJECTS FOR AMERICAN INDIANS WITH DISABILITIES Alaska total: Arizona total: California total: Colorado total: Connecticut total: Georgia total: Idaho total: Kansas total:

Louisiana total: Michigan total: Minnesota total: Mississippi total: Montana total: 10 4 4 2 1 1 3 1 2 1 2 1 5 http://www.nau.edu/ihd/CANAR/map.html Nevada total:

New Mexico total: New York total: North Carolina total: North Dakota total: Oklahoma total: Oregon total: South Dakota total: Washington total: Wisconsin total: Wyoming total: Ontario Canada total: 1 4 2 1 4 8 2 4 5 3 2

1 Federally-Recognized Indian Tribes In Kansas Iowa Tribe of KS & NV Route 1, Box 58A White Cloud, Kansas 66094 (913) 595-3258 (FAX) 595-6610 Kickapoo Tribe of Indians P.O. Box 271 Horton, Kansas 64439 (913) 486-2131 (FAX) 486-2801 Prairie Band of Potawatomi 14880 K Road Mayetta, Kansas 66439 (913) 966-2255 (FAX) 966-2144 Sac & Fox Nation of MO Route 1, Box 60 Reserve, Kansas 66434 (913) 742-7471 (FAX) 742-3785

On April 4, 2008, the U.S. government's Federal Register issued an official list of 562 tribes in the Federal Register as Indian Entities Recognized and Eligible To Receive Services From the United States Bureau of Indian Affairs. MVTO Thank you From Muscogee (Creek) Nation Vocational Rehabilitation

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