Monday Morning Message - Duval County Public Schools

Monday Morning Message - Duval County Public Schools

Our Voice. Our Schools. Our Children Monday Morning Message US History MMM: (September 24th October 5th) Week 7 - Unit 3 Lesson A: Immigration, Lesson B: Urbanization Week 8 - Unit 3 Lesson C: Problems & Philosophies, Lesson D: The Rise of Segregation September 24th October 5th 2018 Matt Campese Executive Director

[email protected] TiLena Robinson Specialist (High School) [email protected] 904-390-2925 LaShawna Campbell Specialist (Middle School) [email protected] Standards Unit 3 Lesson A SS.912.A.3.7: Compare the experience of European immigrants in the east to that of Asian immigrants in the

West (the Chinese Exclusion Act, Gentlemens Agreement with Japan). Test Item Remarks/Examples: May include, but are not limited to, nativism, integration of immigrants into society when comparing Old (before 1890) and New immigrants (after 1890), Immigration Act of 1924. Unit 3 Lesson B SS.912.A.3.2: Examine the social, political, and economic cause, course, and consequences of the Second Industrial Revolution that began in the late 19th century. SS.912.A.3.11: Analyze the impact of political machines in United States cities in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Test Item Remarks/Examples: May include, but are not limited to, Boss Tweed, Tammany Hall, George Washington Plunkitt, Washington Gladden, Thomas Nast. Standards

Unit 3 Lesson C: SS.912.A.3.8: Examine the importance of social change and reform in the late 19th and early 20th centuries (class system, migration from farms to cities, Social Gospel movement, role of settlement houses and churches in providing services to the poor). SS.912.A.3.10: Review different economic and philosophic ideologies. Test Item Remarks/Examples: Economic examples may include, but are not limited to, market economy, mixed economy, planned economy and philosophic examples are capitalism, socialism, communism, anarchy. Standards Unit 3 Lesson D: SS.912.A.2.5: Assess how Jim Crow Laws influenced life for African Americans and other racial/ethnic minority

groups. SS.912.A.2.6: Compare the effects of the Black Codes and the Nadir on freed people, and analyze the sharecropping system and debt peonage as practiced in the United States. SS.912.A.3.12: Compare how different nongovernmental organizations and progressives worked to shape public policy, restore economic opportunities, and correct injustices in American life. Test Item Remarks/Examples: May include, but are not limited to, NAACP, YMCA, Womens Christian Temperance Union, National Womens Suffrage Association, National Womens Party, Robert LaFollette, Florence Kelley, Ida M. Tarbell, Eugene Debs, Carrie Chapman Catt, Alice Paul, Theodore Roosevelt, William Taft, Woodrow Wilson Upton Sinclair, Booker T. Washington, W.E.B. DuBois, Gifford Pinchot, William Jennings Bryan. Objectives Unit 3 Lesson A

1 class period Students will: Explain why the Second Industrial Revolution drove European and Asian immigrants to the United States during the late 19th and early 20th century. Compare and/or contrast the experiences of the European immigrants and Asian immigrants in America. Unit 3 Lesson B 1 class period Assess how the growth of industry impacted the development of America socially, politically, and economically.

Describe the impact of political machines in America society. Objectives Unit 3 Lesson C 2 class periods Students will: Analyze the social changes and reforms in the late 19th and 20th centuries. Contrast the economic and philosophic ideologies of this time. Describe the Gilded Age ideas and connections to challenges faced during this time. Unit 3 Lesson D

1 class period Assess how Jim Crow laws affected the lives of African Americans living in the South. Explain how the Nadir, the sharecropping system and debt peonage affected African Americans politically, socially, and economically. Explain how African American leaders tried to end racial discrimination and assess how their efforts influenced change. Focus Unit 3 Lesson A: Understand how the growth of the United States as a result of the Second Industrial Revolution,

encouraged immigrants to come to the United States and seek opportunities to improve their quality of life, Students should also understand that while the influx of immigrants benefited the United States it also served as a catalyst to the changing social climate of the country. Resources: Textbook: Florida United States History & Geography, Modern Times; McGraw Hill (2013): Chapter 4, Lesson 1 (pages 114 - 117) Chapter 4, Lesson 2 (pages 118 - 121)

Unit 3 Lesson B: Understand the impact of the shift to an industrialized nation and the rapid growth of urban areas and how this affects the political, social, and economic conditions of the late 1800s and early 1900s. Chapter 4, Lesson 3 (pages 122 - 127) Unit 3 Lesson C: Understand how the Industrial Revolution led to the emergence of new economic and philosophical ideologies about the governments role in society. Chapter 4, Lesson 5 (pages 133 137)

Unit 3 Lesson D: Understand how Jim Crow laws led to the rise of segregation and denied African Americans civil rights that had been guaranteed with the Reconstruction Amendments. Chapter 4, Lesson 4 (pages 128 - 132) Gateway to U.S. History (Jarrett and Yahng, 2014) Chapter 5: The Labor Movement (The Rise of Ideology, pages 89 90) Chapter 6: Cities, Immigrants, and Farmers (pages 95 - 110)

Content Focus Breakdown Content Focus Breakdown Content Focus Breakdown Content Focus Breakdown Content Focus Breakdown New Topic

Content Focus Breakdown Content Focus Breakdown Content Focus Breakdown Gradual Release Unit 3 Lesson A After the bell ringer, as best practices for the I Do: The teacher identifies the main groups of immigrants in the United States and provide students with details about the

Old Immigrants via PowerPoint as students record the information in a graphic organizer. For the We Do, the teacher and students read about the New immigrants (Gateway to U.S. History, page 100) as a class and identify the key details that should be recorded in the graphic organizer (when they came, why they came, where they came from, their characteristics, where they entered the U.S., their experiences). I Do

We Do Gradual Release Unit 3 Lesson A For the They Do, students work collaboratively as they read information about the experiences of European and Asian immigrants and identify the key details that should be recorded in the graphic organizer (when they came, why they came, where they came from, their characteristics, where they entered the U.S., their experiences).

o D ey h T Independently (You Do), students ill use the information in their graphic organizer to complete a RAFT assignment: o D

ey h T Role: Newspaper Reporter Audience: The American Public Format: Newspaper Article Topic: Compare the experiences of New European and Asian immigrants, describing their reasons for migrating, the challenges they faced, their experiences, and how Americans reacted to them. They Do

o D ey h T What Administrators Should See Students engaged in meaningful tasks and are taking ownership of their learning. Best practices in the US History classroom would include the appropriate pacing for the Gradual Release Model as well as the consistent use of student collaborative tasks, student discourse, and the critical alignment to our Standards and Test Item Specifications on a daily basis.

Common Misconceptions Students may believe: All immigrants were treated the same after arriving to the United States. The United States welcomed all immigrants because it was a nation made up of immigrants. However, anti-immigration societies began to appear, riots took place, and legislation was passed to restrict immigration of certain groups (Gentlemens Agreement, Chinese Exclusion Act) Urbanization was a slow process but should understand that it took less than 50 years for cities to become Americas social and cultural economic lifeline. Since cities were crowded, dangerous, and dirty that hindered everyone from being able to achieve the American Dream. The federal government has always provided aid to help the needy but relief efforts to help the poor were spear headed by citizens and private organizations long before the federal government took on the responsibility of regulating the American economy and protecting its citizens against severe economic hardship.

African Americans were able to enjoy the freedoms guaranteed by the passage of the 13 th, 14th and 15th Amendments when in realty Jim Crow legislation led to the Nadir in race relations in the United States that did not end until many of the civil rights injustices were addressed when the Civil Rights movement of the 1960s began. Government in the United States always looks out for citizens but Southern states established segregation/discrimination with the passage of Jim Crow laws. Once a law is put into effect it cannot be changed but the Civil Rights Act of 1875, which prohibited segregation, was overturned by the Supreme Court. Professional Learning Opportunities U.S. History Social Studies Meeting, Tuesday, October 30, 2018. Time: 7:30 am 2:30 pm Location: Ed White High School (Houston Hall)

2018 High School Essay Contest Commemorating the 150th Anniversary of the ratification of the 14th Amendment. Prompt: The Fourteenth Amendment was ratified 150 years ago and commanded, in part, that no person shall be denied equal protection of the laws. Congress and the courts have applied this equal protection clause to our right to equal education opportunities. How does the phrase, Equal Protection of the Laws, impact you as a student? 1st Place ($2,000), 2nd Place ($1,000), 3rd Place ($500) Entries must be submitted online (www.flmd.uscourts.gov) Deadline: Noon, October 15, 2018 Mary Margret Giannini (904) 301 6754 or [email protected]

If everyone is moving forward together, then - Henry success takes care of itself Ford Have a Great Week! For More Information Contact Matt Campese, Executive Director Closing Message TiLena Robinson, Specialist (High School) LaShawna Campbell, Specialist (Middle School)

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