Hand Hygiene Journey - StarChapter

Hand Hygiene Journey - StarChapter

World Health Organization (WHO) 5 Moments and Hand Hygiene Measurement Tool Kit July 10, 2013 for Indiana IHA-APIC 1 Webinar Agenda Overview & Introductions Betsy Lee, IHA Sonya Mauzey, APIC-Indiana President

Understanding the WHO 5 Moments for Hand Hygiene Jennifer K. Spivey MSN, RN, CNOR, CIC, Infection Preventionist Understanding the APIC-IN Hand Hygiene Measurement TOOLKIT Michele Gonser, RN, BSN, CIC, Infection Preventionist, Parkview Regional Medical Center Hand Hygiene Journey Rachel White, MLS(ASCP)CM, CHC, CIC, Infection Prevention Coordinator, Margaret Mary Community Hospital Questions

2 Evaluation Webinar funded by CMS through the Partnership for Patients CMS wants 80% of participants to evaluate educational sessions As part of this initiative, our organization agrees to: Participate and evaluate: Participate in educational sessions and technical assistance offerings and provide feedback and session evaluation in a timely fashion. Please complete the simple evaluation by July 18, 2013: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/HandHygieneWebinar 3

Understanding the WHO 5 Moments for Hand Hygiene Jennifer K. Spivey MSN, RN, CNOR, CIC Infection Preventionist Objectives Identify how the WHO 5 moments for measurement relates to the indication for hand hygiene contained in the WHO Guidelines. Describe the underlying theory of the WHO 5 moments for hand hygiene and how that relates to the before and after indications for opportunities.

Define the patient zone and what is the difference between an indication, an opportunity, and a moment for hand hygiene. Provide examples for the WHO 5 moments of measurement consistent with the APIC toolkit for use. Its all about measurement WHOs decision to address hand hygiene by focusing on 5 moments was intended to make it easier to understand when there is a risk of pathogen transmission via the hands.

WHOs decision also included that the caregiver memorize and assimilate these 5 moments into the dynamics of healthcare activities. WHOs intended use is to reduce the number of times when hand hygiene occurs to the minimum for maximum patient safety. Endorsed as Best Practice measurement by APIC Indiana Board of Directors 2013, and the Indianapolis Pt Safety Coalition Perioperative Committee 2012.

Its all about Patient zones Indications for hand hygiene depend on the health care works movements between geographical areas (the care environment and the patient surroundings) called the patient zone: Examples of patient zones: Half of a semi private room that is dedicated to the patient All of a private room The immediate area surrounding the patient in a open unit ( PACU or ED) The immediate area surrounding the patient in the

operative/procedural room (not the entire OR suite) Its all about the patient zone Regardless of whether gloves are used or not! -----indicates patient zone----- Hand hygiene and glove use The use of gloves does not replace the need for sanitizing your hands. WHO 5 moments include to sanitize your hands before and after removal of gloves, regardless of movement within the 5 moments. You should wear gloves only when indicated for use, otherwise they become a major risk for

germ transmission. Patient zones exist in EDs, PACCU, Clinics... The OR/Procedural Patient zone Environmental Transmission Patient zones exist in Ambulatory Care Special Care Nursery patient zones The Inanimate Environment Can Facilitate Transmission

X represents VRE culture positive sites ~ Contaminated surfaces increase cross-transmission ~ Abstract: The Risk of Hand and Glove Contamination after Contact with a VRE (+) Patient Environment. Hayden M, ICAAC, 2001, Chicago, IL. Survival of Pathogens on surfaces C Difficle Staphylococcus VRE Aceintobacter

Norovirus Adenovirus Rotovirus SARS, HIV etc. H1N1- Influenza A > 5 months! 7 months 4 months 5 months 3 weeks 3 months 3 months Days to week

Few days Its all about theory of prevention of transmission Health-care activity is made up of a succession of tasks during which health-care workers hands touch different types of surfaces (patient, objects, body fluids, etc.). Depending on the order in which these contacts occur, pathogen transmission from one source to the must be interrupted, as contact is a potential source of contamination. It is during the interval between two contacts that the moments (indication or indications) for hand hygiene occur. Indications, opportunities, and moments

The before indications are present when there is a risk of microbial transmission to the patient; the actions that correspond to these indications protect the patient. The after indications are present when there is a risk of microbial transmission to the HCW, and/or to the HCW environment or other person present. The actions that correspond to these indications protect HCW and the healthcare environment and ultimately other patients. The right action, at the right momentwill contribute significantly to safe care and decrease risk for HAIs. Indications, opportunities, and moments The Indications: The reason

why hand hygiene is necessary at the given moment. It is related to the risk of pathogen transmission from one surface to another. These indications are the five moments for hand hygiene. The Opportunities: This is important when observing compliance. From the point of view of the observer; the opportunity exists whenever on of the moments for hand hygiene is present and observed. Several moments can come together in one opportunity. The Moments: They occur during movements between geographical areas, during transitions between tasks near patients, between patients, or some distance from them. Before Touching the Patient Patient Care Units examples: shaking hands, stroking a childs forehead

helping a patient to move around, get washed applying oxygen mask, giving physiotherapy taking pulse, blood pressure, chest auscultation, abdominal palpation, recording ECG OR and Procedure areas: Before checking in your patient in pre op area Before bringing pt into the OR suite ( at door) or Before you hook up all items to pt Before putting on gloves to help Anesthesia with ET tube, swan, etc Before placement of Foley Before Prep Before Clean/ Aseptic Procedures Patient Care Units examples: brushing the patient's teeth,

instilling eye drops skin lesion care, wound dressing, subcutaneous injection catheter insertion, opening a vascular access system or a draining system, secretion aspiration preparation of food, medication, pharmaceutical products, sterile material. OR and Procedure areas: Placement of Foley catheter Placement of IV lines/Swan Hanging blood products Pouring sterile fluids on field in non- emergencies After Body Fluid Exposure Risk

Patient Care Units examples: brushing the patient's teeth, instilling eye drops, secretion aspiration skin lesion care, wound dressing, subcutaneous injection drawing and manipulating any fluid sample, opening a draining system, endotracheal tube insertion and removal

clearing up urines, feces, vomit, handling waste cleaning of contaminated and visibly soiled material or areas (soiled bed linen lavatories, urinal, bedpan, medical instruments) OR and Procedure areas examples: After handling sponges ( after removal of gloves) After emptying urine from Foley bag After handling specimens Number 4 above applies in both settings After taking off gloves from terminal room turnover (end of series of events- doing dirtiest last)

After Touching the Patient Patient Care Units examples: shaking hands, stroking a child forehead helping a patient to move around, get washed applying oxygen mask, giving physiotherapy taking pulse, blood pressure, chest auscultation, abdominal palpation, recording ECG OR and Procedure areas examples: After checking pt in pre op / chart After positioning patient/ before throwing sterile supplies After leaving pt in PACCU if you are transporting After case gets started this becomes more about

pts environment After touching the Patient Surroundings Patient Care Units examples: changing bed linen, with the patient out of the bed perfusion speed adjustment/ monitoring alarm holding a bed rail, leaning against a bed, a night table clearing the bedside table OR and Procedure areas examples: Removal of bed linens/drapes- after removing gloves After getting case started and moving up equipment/ before charting Hunting and gathering supplies ( non urgentdepends on case: foam in/foam out)

Use critical thinking skills it is a sterile environment/ think of high touch surfaces having greater risk if not decontaminated between cases Do Not be too hard on yourself or your team! Putting it all together Why do the 5 moments not include hand hygiene before touching furniture in the patients immediate environment? The 5 moments are prioritized on the basis of risk transmission. There is not an indication to perform hand hygiene before touching the patients environment (bed frame- rails, bedside table, patient table). The most important reason why is the fact that any object or surface in the patients immediate surroundings is part of the patient zone and is considered contaminated by the patients own

pathogens. Putting it all together The first moment on approaching the patient is moment 1. Before Patient contact Before entering the patient zone (crossing that theoretical dotted line) which separates the pt. environment from the healthcare environment. The indication is immediately before touching the patient. If the bedside table is touched hand hygiene does not need to occur before this action. Hand hygiene should occur either when entering the pt. zone and before touching the table and then touching the patient, or after touching the table and immediately before touching the patient.

In both cases the indication is before patient Putting it all together When observing hand hygiene always remember to ask: Is what I am observing an indication for hand hygiene according to the Five moments? If no, then there is no need for hand hygiene. There is no indication for before patient environment when in the patient zone. If you sanitize your hands when entering the patient zone, you may touch the environment and then the patient because your hands will be contaminated with that individual patients pathogens. In the event that you touch the patients environment only and not the patient you must sanitize your hands when leaving the patient zone according to the moment, after contact with the patients immediate environment.

Putting it all together Why does Before Aseptic Task include many tasks which are not usually associated with the term aseptic task; i.e. Oral care? This is for simplicity sake to include any task or procedure that involve contact with the patients mucous membranes or non intact skin, or with any invasive medical device. This is the time that when in the patient zone, you must sanitize your hands just before this task. This is one of the most important moments that matter most to prevent device related infections and SSIs. Putting it all together How to apply the 5 moments in multiple bed occupancy or sub optimal

spaces: These patients often times become colonized by the same microbes. Compliance is still important, focus on moments 2 and 3.before aseptic procedures and after body fluid risk exposure to capture the highest risk for transmission when proximity of the patient zone is shared space. Use critical thinking skills and logic when undertaking tasks within this patient environment; the indications before and after patient contact, when moving from one patient to the other. In sub optimal spaces, the principles can still be applied if you use each bed as its own zone. Examples of Physician Non compliance

Before and after removal of gloves! Surgeons, Anesthesia, all specialties. Lack of performance of hand hygiene before or after patient contact. ( includes isolation rooms with proper PPE) Before, during and after aseptic procedures- starting lines, gloves are not enough, sanitize hands before and after removal of gloves.

Soiled gloves left on after finished with procedures, or central or arterial line manipulation. Preparing drugs or equipment for a procedure to follow with soiled gloves . Other: picking up something off the floor then proceeding with patient care or contact without sanitizing hands. No hand hygiene when in the patient zone regardless of indications. Understanding the APIC-IN Hand Hygiene Measurement TOOL KIT Michele Gonser, RN, BSN, CIC Infection Preventionist Parkview Regional Medical Center

Objectives Purpose of the Tool Kit Background APIC Indiana Recommendations Measurement Data Collectors Sample Size Continuous Improvement Tool Kit Purpose

To reduce harm from preventable HAIs To adopt best practices with hand hygiene measurement To assist with standardization of hand hygiene measurement and

reporting Tool Kit Background Hand hygiene the most important method to reduce transmission of organisms Best practice standards must be selected Measuring

adherence is fundamental and complex The basics of measurement follows evidence based principles Determine WHAT to Measure Activity Hand hygiene PPE use Method

Alcohol based hand foam vs. soap and water All hand hygiene Discipline Department-specific staff All healthcare workers Determine WHAT to Measure Time-Frame All open hours evenings/nights/weekends Business hours Communication

Reporting Process improvement Data Collectors Training program WHO 5 Moments Anonymous observation Forms and tools Random sampling Consistent standardization = reliable data Knowledge assessment

Sample Size Estimate opportunities Calculate annually Include in Risk Assessment Minimum sample The larger the sample the more reliable the data Refer to Risk Assessment Implement

Sample Size tools TJC suggested sample size Estimating Hand Hygiene Opportunities TJC Sample Size Population size of available cases Population size of Population size of cases Population size of < 30 = sample 100% of

30-100 = sample 30 cases 101-500 = sample 50 > 500 = sample 70 cases Estimating HH Opportunities Total number of ICU beds Multiply by 12 (estimated number of opportunities) Multiply by 24 (# of hours in the day) Multiply by 30 (# of days in the month) Equals estimated number of ICU opportunities:___________ Number of opportunities currently observed: __________ Total number of med/surg beds Multiply by 6 (estimated number of opportunities) Multiply by 24 (# of hours in the day)

Multiply by 30 (# of days in the month) Equals the estimated number of Med/Surg opportunities:___________ Number of opportunities currently observed: __________ Future Goal: _____________ Estimating HH Opportunities Total number of Ancillary patients per hour Multiply by 3 (estimated number of opportunities) Multiply by # of hours open per day Multiply by # of days open per month Equals the estimated number of Ancillary opportunities:_______________ Number of opportunities currently observed: __________ Add all 3 numbers together to get the total number of opportunities

Number of opportunities currently observed: __________ Future Goal: _____________ Continuous Improvement Annual assessment Measurement system Data reliability Set goals Increase sample size Improve process

Compare data trends Measurement Tools Sample Data Collection Forms Paper monitoring tools iScrub Lite Sample Hand Hygiene Observations Circle YES if hand hygiene is performed using soap & w ater or alcohol hand rub. #1 Upon entry to the room before touching the patient or the environment.

#2 Before clean/aseptic procedure. #3 After body fluid exposure risk. #4 After touching a patient w hen leaving patient zone #5 After touching patient surroundings w hen leaving patient zone. #1 Person Observed #2 #3 #5 MD

RN HCA RT Other Yes / No Yes / No Yes / No Yes / No Yes / No MD RN HCA

RT Other Yes / No Yes / No Yes / No Yes / No Yes / No MD RN HCA RT Other

Yes / No Yes / No Yes / No Yes / No Yes / No Educational Materials Training slides Testing Sample #4 Handouts 5 Moments Fact Sheet long form Fact Sheet short form

Comments Tool Kit Summary APIC Indiana Hand Hygiene Measurement Recommended Guidelines Standardized Measurement Trained Data Collectors Valid Sample Size Easy-To-Use Tools Timely Communication Continuous Improvement Hand Hygiene Journey

Southeastern Indiana Patient Safety Coalition (SEIPSC) Rachel White, MLS(ASCP)CM, CHC, CIC Infection Prevention Coordinator Margaret Mary Community Hospital How It All Began Southeastern Indiana Patient Safety Coalition Progressive Movers & Shakers Transparent

Goal To find a coalition topic with high patient safety impact to focus on for Improvement. Background The coalition brainstormed and prioritized High Impact Patient Safety Focus to work on as a Team. Hand Hygiene Invited Infection Preventionists Shared individual processes

Discussed variation Requested standard tool kit from APIC Toolkit Test Draft version Tested by all within the coalition Feedback was forwarded back to APIC Revisions made FINAL PRODUCT

Volunteers for 2nd Trial. Survey Monkey Evaluation Webinar funded by CMS through the Partnership for Patients CMS wants 80% of participants to evaluate educational sessions As part of this initiative, our organization agrees to: Participate and evaluate: Participate in educational sessions and technical assistance offerings and provide feedback and session evaluation in a timely fashion. Please complete the simple evaluation by June 19, 2013: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/HandHygieneWebinar 48

Thank you 49

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