Bond Valuation - Bauer College of Business

Bond Valuation - Bauer College of Business

Bond Valuation Chapter 6 outline

Terminology The Yield to Maturity and Bond Prices Corporate Bonds Further questions Bond Terminology Face value Coupon rate

Maturity date Bond Terminology Bonds make two types of payments: The promised interest payments are called coupons. These coupons are paid periodically every six months, annually until the maturity date of the bond.

The principal or face value of the bond is the notional amount used to calculate the interest payments. The face value is paid at maturity. Bonds can trade at a price that is greater than (premium), smaller than (discount), or equal to (par) the face value. Coupon payments (CPN) are determined by the coupon rate as follows: Coupon Rate Face Value CPN = Number of Coupon Payments per Year

Zero-Coupon Bonds zero-coupon bonds have a coupon rate of 0%. Treasury bills (U.S. government bonds with a maturity of up to one year) are zero-coupon bonds Zero-Coupon bonds are also called pure discount bonds since they trade a discount relative to their face value Consider a one year, zero-coupon bond with face value $100,000 and price $96,618.36. The discount reflects the

opportunity cost of capital while the bond pays no interest as an investor you are compensated for the time value of money Coupon Bonds Pay face value at maturity and regular coupons throughout the life of the bond Treasury Notes are coupon baring bonds backed by the U.S. Treasury with original maturity of 1-10 years

Treasury Bonds are coupon baring bonds backed by the U.S. Treasury with original maturity of over 10 years Coupon Bonds Yield to Maturity and Bond Prices Yield to Maturity The Yield to Maturity of a bond or YTM (or just yield) is the

discount rate that sets the present value of the promised bond payments equal to the current market price of the bond. The bond YTM is basically the IRR of the investment in the bond Considering the zero-coupon bond from before: 100000 96618.36 = YTM1 =3.5%

1+YTM1 Yield to Maturity What do we learn from the fact that a one-year Treasury bill is trading at YTM of 3.5%? 100000 96618.36 = YTM1 =3.5% 1+YTM1

Since the Treasury bill is risk free (the face value is paid with certainty), it must be that the competitive market risk-free interest rate for a one year is 3.5% Yield to maturity of an n-Year Zero-Coupon Bond 1 n FV

YTM n = -1 P Calculating Yield to Maturity Calculating Bond Prices from the YTM Bond Prices Dynamics

The price of a bond can change due to shifts in the interest rate (shifts in YTM) and can change over time as its remaining maturity (or term) shortens and the number of future coupons declines An increase in the YTM will decrease the price of the bond While holding the YTM fixed the price of the bond can either increase or decrease overtime depending on whether the coupon rate is higher or lower than the bond YTM

Bond Prices Dynamics The graph illustrates changes in price and yield for a 30 year discount bond over its

life. Corporate Bonds Risk of Default Unlike Treasury bonds that are backed by the U.S. government and are therefore considered risk-free, corporate bonds are backed by the corporation

Corporations might not be able to keep their promise to bond holders and pay their debt obligations Yield to Maturity of Corporate Bonds The YTM of corporate bonds is calculated the same way it is calculated for Treasury bonds But in the case of corporate bonds the YTM does not represent the IRR on an investment in the bond

This is because the promised payments need not be the actual payments in corporate bonds The YTM is always higher than the expected return of investing in the bond Measuring the Risk of Default Credit Ratings Credit rating agencies evaluate the likelihood of default and provide bond ratings to help

investors understand the risks they are exposed to when investing in corporate bonds Ratings range from AAA for best quality bonds, to BBB for bonds with speculative characteristics, to CCC for bonds of poor standing Credit Ratings and Corporate Yield Curves (2005)

Further questions IRR on an Investment in a Bond Question 12 (2nd Edition): Suppose you purchase a 10year bond with 6% annual coupons. You hold the bond for four years, and sell it immediately after receiving the fourth coupon. If the bonds yield to maturity was 5% when you purchased and sold the bond, a. What was flows will you pay and receive from your

investment in the bond per $100 face value? b. What is the internal rate of return of your investment? IRR on an Investment in a Bond The purchase price $6 1 $100 P0 = 1+

=$107.72 10 10 5% 1.05 1.05 Selling price following fourth coupon $6 1 $100 P4 = 1+

=$105.07 6 6 5% 1.05 1.05 IRR on an Investment in a Bond Price Sensitivity Question 13 (2

Edition): Consider the following bonds: nd Bond Coupon Rate (annual payment)

A B C D 0% 0% 4% 8%

Maturity (years) 15 10 15 10 a. What is the percentage change in the price of each

bond if its yield to maturity falls from 6% to 5%? b. Which of the bonds A-D is most sensitive to a 1% drop in interest rates from 6% to 5% and why? Which bond is least sensitive? Provide an intuitive explanation for your answer. Price Sensitivity Bonds of longer maturities and zero coupon bonds

are more sensitive to changes in the interest rate. Example: yield to maturity of a Coupon Bond with Maturity N 1 1 FV P =CPN 1+

N N y ( 1+ y) ( 1+ y) Using Excel to Calculate the Yield to Maturity of Coupon Bonds This 3% yield is for half a year. Thus, we can say that the

bond has a yield to maturity equal to a 6% APR with semiannual compounding

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