ASA Template Training - National Institutes of Health

ASA Template Training - National Institutes of Health

FY02 ASA Presentation MANAGE REAL PROPERTY PROJECTS Team Members: Robert Sheridan Dyal Sharma Gerald Hines David Gordon Olga Acosta-Polston Ken Roman Barbara Moskowitz Veronica Crawford-Robinson Robert England Deborah Aylor With Assistance From: Amy Vandenberg Paul Allen Joe Wolski 18 November 2002 1 FY02 ASA Presentation MANAGE REAL PROPERTY PROJECTS Discrete Services DS1 Establish/administer acquisition vehicles for A/E & const. services DS2 Manage the acquisition of leased facilities

Veronica Crawford-Robinson DS3 Manage the planning of capital facilities Gerald Hines DS4 Manage the planning of leased facilities Gerald Hines DS5 Manage the design and construction of capital facilities Dyal Sharma DS6 Manage the design and build out for leased facilities Olga Acosta-Polston Robert Sheridan/ Dave Gordon 2 Deployment Flowchart Service Group: Manage Real Property Projects Date: 6 13 02 Participants: ASA Team

Planning process identifies need Space acquisition approved Generate work request (POR if appropriate) Award design contract Design Award construction contract Construct Commission space Space occupied Handoff Closeout 3 Service Group Block Diagram

4 Table of Contents Main Presentation ASA Template ..7 Customer Perspective. .10 Customer Segmentation . 11 Customer Satisfaction. .17 Internal Business Process Perspective...25 Service Group Block Diagram.. 26 Process Mapping27 Process Measures..28 Learning and Growth Perspective.34 Data & Analysis...35 Unique Measures.36 Readiness Statement..41 Financial Perspective...43 Unit Cost44 Unique Financial Measures46 Asset Utilization ......51 Conclusions and Recommendations.54 5 Table of Contents Appendices Customer satisfaction graphs Process maps Process measures graphs

Learning and Growth Assessment Unit cost graphs DCAB Training Program 6 ASA Template - 2002 VERSION II - 7/17/02 Service Group Manage real property projects Discrete Services DS1. Establish/Administer acquisition vehicles for A/E & Construction Services DS2. Manage acquisition of leased facilities DS3. Manage the planning of capital facilities. DS4. Manage the planning of leased facilities. DS5. Manage the Design and construction of Capital facilities DS6. Manage the Design and Build-out for Leased facilities Customer Value Proposition Provide planning and project management services to ensure that space to be occupied by NIH ICs responds to the customer's facility needs, is reliable, functional, safe and well-constructed, and is provided within the agreed-upon timeframe and budget. Service Strategy X Operational Excellence Customer Intimacy Product Leadership Growth X Sustain Harvest Team Leader Robert Sheridan Team Members

Olga Acosta-Polston, Ken Roman, Melissa Richardson/ Veronica Crawford-Robinson, Dyal Sharma, Dave Gordon , Barbara Moskowitz, Robert England 7 Customer Perspective Performance Objective Performance Measure Increase understanding of customer base Customer segmentation of Discrete Services DS1 Work requests by Project Team DS3 & 4 Approved SJDs by IC DS5 Square footage under construction by IC vs. campus presence DS6 Square footage under renovation in leased facilities by IC vs. campus presence Increase customer satisfaction Customer satisfaction ratings from the ORS Customer Scorecard for each Discrete Service DS1,2,5,6 Work with OQM to develop appropriate survey instrument for 2003 DS 3&4 ORS Customer Scorecard Internal Business Process Perspective Performance Objective Performance Measure Increase understanding of processes. Complete process maps of Service Group/Discrete Services Identify methods to measure processes.

Identify and report on process measures for Discrete Services DS1 Award contract actions in timely manner DS1 Actual time to award contract vs. published PALT DS 5&6 Manage cost and schedule DS5 Earned Value graphs to track schedule and cost DS 6 Going forward: estimated duration and cost vs. actual DS5&6 Manage quality DS5&6 Compliance with Quality System Manual procedures DS5&6 Going forward: Number of DCAB-generated change orders 8 Learning and Growth Perspective Performance Objective Enhance quality of work life for employees in ORS. Performance Measure Turnover Sick Leave Usage Contacts/Complaints with EEO/ER/ADR Awards/Recognition Maintain & enhance competencies for the future organization.Analysis of Readiness Index DS1,5&6 Maintain workload per employee consistent with efficient and high quality work DS1,5&6 Workload against FTEs/Vacancies

Financial Perspective Performance Objective Performance Measure Minimize unit cost at a defined service level. Change in Unit Cost for each Discrete Service Maximize utilization of assets. Actual assets utilized/planned asset utilization for each Discrete Service DS5&6 Prices competitive with other organizations DS5 Management cost per $ of construction DS5 Cost per square foot of construction DS6 Going forward: management cost per $ of construction 9 Customer Perspective o Customer Segmentation o Customer Satisfaction 10 Customer Segmentation Who Are Our Customers? DS1 Acquisition Vehicle for A/E & Const. Services

DS2 Manage the acquisition of Leased facilities DS3 Manage the planning of Capital facilities DS4 Manage the planning of leased facilities DS5 Manage the design and construction of capital facilities DS6 Manage the design and build-out for leased facilities 11 Customer Segmentation FY 2002: 191 approved SJDs FY 2001: 100 approved SJDs Approved SJD Grand Totals of Approved SJDs for Each IC in FY 01 & 02 20 15 10

5 0 OD NIDDK NICHD NEI NIAMS NIAAA NCI NHLBI NIBIB NIAID NIMH NHGRI CIT CC NIEHS NIDCD NIDCR

NINDS NINR NIA NLM NCCAM NIGMS ORS Grand Total FY 02 12 14 18 15 18 2 13 11 2

11 11 8 1 16 3 7 3 7 2 6 3 2 1 4 Grand Total FY 01 8 11

8 5 5 6 5 2 1 6 2 3 1 2 5 6 5 2 3

5 6 NIDA CRS 2 1 NCRR 1 12 Capital Funded Facilities Customers for 3 Projects Capital Funded Facility Customers for 3 Projects 60.00% % of Involvement 50.00% 40.00% 30.00% 20.00% 10.00% 0.00%

NIAID NHLBI ORS NHGRI NIDDK NIAMS NCI NIDCD NEI Other ICs and Offices % of B&F SqFt IC % of Campus Population 13 Leased Facility Customers by IC Leased Facility Custom ers by IC 40.00% 35.00% 25.00% 20.00% 15.00%

10.00% 5.00% CC O th er IC 's O RS NH LB I NL M NC I NI NR NE I NI DC D NI DD K NC RR

NI M H NI ND S NH G RI NI A M S NI BI B NI CH D NI TA A C NI DA NI A A A NI A O

D ID 0.00% NI A % of Involvem ent 30.00% ICs and Offices % of SqFt Under Renovation % of Total Population 14 Number and $-Value of DCAB Projects per Project Team for FY '01 & FY'02 $120,000,000 FY '01 $ Amount of Projects 250 FY '02 $ Amount of Projects FY '01 Number of Projects FY '02 Number of Projects $100,000,000 200

150 $60,000,000 100 $40,000,000 Number of Projects (Line) $ Value of Projects (Bar) $80,000,000 50 $20,000,000 $0 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Other Project Team 15 Customer Segmentation Conclusion Who are our Customers? 30 potential IC customers at NIH Customer Segmentation Data Shows this Service Group provided support for 28 of these ICs during FY 01 and FY 02 16 Customer Scorecard o o o Customer Satisfaction Survey Status of Customer Satisfaction Survey Results of Customer Satisfaction Survey 17 Proposed Survey Methodology Submitted to OQM

Customer Survey to be coordinated at ORS level FY 03 DS3 and DS4 Under a separate ASA have completed a customer survey 18 Proposed Survey Methodology Manage Real Property Projects 8/16/02 Discrete Service Lead Customers Customers segmented by # of vehicles, dollar amount Customer segments DCAB 99%; PWB and others 1% DS 1: Establish/Admin acquisition vehicles for A/E and construction Olga

AcostaPoston DCAB, PWB, miscellaneous DS 2: Manage acquisition of leased facilities Melissa Richardson (Veronica CrawfordWilliams) ICs # of leases; data being analyzed E/Os, A/Os of key ICs DS 3: Manage planning of capital facilities DS 4: Manage planning of lease facilities Gerald Hines ICs

# requests; amount of sq. feet; admin vs. research space Institute Directors, Scientific Directors, E/Os, A/Os of key ICs DS 5: Manage design and construction of capital facilities Dyal Sharma 6-10 ICs There have been only 6-10 capital projects in last several years; data being compiled DS 6: Manage design and build-out for leased facilities Bob Sheridan

ICs by frequency # of and size of demand; data being compiled Selected E/Os and/ or A/Os by IC (customer may be A/O or A/O and E/O, depending on IC) Selected E/Os and/or A/Os of key ICs Proposed Mode of Administration Hard copy to: DCAB Branch Chief, Managers, Project Officers (110 approx) Meeting on 8/21 with

Richardson Team to coordinate approaches and review data re customers Under discussion; will be combined with survey for Develop facilities options in Gerald Hines Provide space planning to support IC programs Service Group Hand delivery 1015 surveys Comments We are exploring having a combined process map for acquire leased space and manage acquisition of leased facilities These two DSs are functionally identical to the Develop facilities options DS. Hand delivery 3040 surveys 19

Customer Satisfaction Survey o DS3 Manage the Planning of Capital Facilities o DS4 Manage the Planning of Leased Facilities 20 Survey Distribution Number of Surveys Distributed 85 Number of Surveys Returned 12 Response Rate 18% Survey Respondents = Directors Executive Officers Scientific Directors SJB 21

Do the facilities planning services in ORS support your Institutes mission planning efforts? Don't Know 9% Not Applicable 0% No 0% Yes 91% Data based on 12 respondents 22 Does the current process work effectively for your Institute to acquire the space you need? Don't Know 0% Not Applicable 0% No 18% Yes 82% Data based on 12 respondents

23 Customer Satisfaction Summary Surveys for FY 03 will help Identify Customer Expectations and whether we are meeting these expectations. Service Group Proposed Methodology Submitted To OQM Survey Addressing Planning Was completed via a different service group. Feedback was positive: 92 % understood the process, 82 % stated the current process for acquiring space works effectively however 18% stated the opposite. We need more data to help quantify our customers needs and expectations 24 Internal Business Process Perspective o Block Diagram o Process Mapping o Process Measures 25 Service Group Block Diagram

26 Process Mapping Each Discrete Service has completed a process map. These Maps have helped identify: The complexity of the Service Group There are a lot of hand offs There are many organizations involved with most processes and decisions Not all processes are being followed Who has the lead for each step Reality checks, possible corrections What Can we do with this information? Should we have fewer DS or more? Should the Steps be reduced or increased? Should the interaction and required associations be more or less? 27 Internal Business Process Measures o S Curve o ISO 9000 Audit Reports o Action Processing Time - CCB 28 Process Measures Louis Stokes Laboratories Building 50 Financial Plan - Gross Billings through August 2000 SCHEDULE 30,000,000

25,000,000 100% 80% 20,000,000 15,000,000 60% Planned 40% Actual 20% Jul-01 Oct-01 Apr-01 Jan-01 Jul-00 Oct-00 Apr-00 Jan-00

Jul-99 Oct-99 Apr-99 Jan-99 Jul-98 Oct-98 10,000,000 Apr-98 0% 5,000,000 0 Au Se Oc No De Ja g- p- t- v- c- n98 98 98 98 98 99 Fe Ma Ap Ma b- r- r- y99 99 99 99 Ju J Au Se Oc n- ul- g- p- t99 99 99 99 99 Projected Cumulative Gross Billings No De Ja Fe Ma Ap Ma Ju v- c- n- b- r- r- y- n99 99 00 00 00 00 00 00

Percent Complete (planned average start vs. actual) J Au ul- g00 00 Actual Cumulative Gross Billings 29 Process Measures ISO 9000 DCAB Quality System Nonconformities 50 45 40 Count/Year 35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0 1999 2000 2001 2002

Year 30 Action Processing Time Action 100 Task Order Modification 80 Frequency . Task Order Mod 60 Contract 40 20 0 early 0-1 1-2 2-3 3-4

4-5 5-6 6-7 7-8 Processing Time (Months) 8-9 9-10 10-11 11-12 greater than 1 year 31 Frequency of Action Delays Based on Maximum PALT for each action 100 On Time Late Action 80

Contract Frequency . Modification 60 Task Order Task Order Mod 40 20 0 13-16 weeks early 9-12 weeks early 5-8 weeks early 1-4 weeks early same day

1-4 weeks late 5-8 weeks late 9-12 weeks late 13-16 weeks late 17-20 weeks late 21-24 weeks late 25-28 weeks late 29-32 weeks late 33-36 greater weeks than 36

late weeks late 32 Internal Business Process Perspective Summary The Discrete Services are spread across ORS. Process maps help visualize the steps DCAB has been certified as an ISO 9000 Organization - Audited Yearly - Report on Non Conformities - Need to identify major/minor & reoccurring CCB Action Processing Time 33 Learning and Growth Perspective o Data & Analysis Supplied by OQM o Unique Measures o Readiness Statement 34 No 522 5214 5215 5222 5223 5224 5225 5226

5227 5228 5229 522B 522D Service Group 5 Total Po p ula tio nE .o s ti fS ma ep te Tu a rat rn ov ion er s Ra To t al te Ho Le urs

av o f e U Sic Av er a k se d S ic g e k L Hou ea r Nu ve s o f mb Us ed er o Re f A w ce Av i ve ar d s er a d Aw g e N ard um s R be Nu ec r o f mb eiv er ed Co of

m p EE la i O Av nts er a g EE e N O u Co m b Nu mp er o mb lai f nts er of Av ER er a ge Ca se N s ER u m b Ca er Nu se of mb s

er o Ca f A D s es R Av er a ge AD Num R C a b er o se s f Learning and Growth Data Table 12 2 6 10 14 12 8 14 6 2 4 5 17 1 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0.08 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.12 363 106 308 376 384 283 350 328 192 0 135 39

436 29 53 51 38 28 24 44 23 32 0 34 8 26 11 0 6 11 15 11 13 18 7 2 5 4 19 0.89 0.00 1.00 1.10 1.10

0.92 1.63 1.29 1.17 1.00 1.25 0.86 1.14 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.07 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.06 1 0 2 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0.08 0.00 0.33 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.12 111 3 0.03 3298 30 122 1.10

0 0.00 2 0.02 5 0.04 5 ADR cases for 111 employees Very low turnover Almost 4 days sick leave per employee 2 ER cases for 111 employees No EEO complaints for 111 employees About 1 award for every employee 35 Learning and Growth Perspective o Unique Measures o DS5 and DS6 36 Declining Workforce; Increasing Workload $900.0 123 122

122 $800.0 $807.8 121 121 119 $600.0 117 $500.0 $400.0 $300.0 $374.0 $364.4 115 $279.4 Actual FTE's Total Construction Budget $700.0 113 $200.0 111

$100.0 110 $- 109 2000 2001 2002 2003 Fiscal Year 37 Yearly FTE's and Vacancies 160 140 120 100 34 33 37 14

11 8 23 24 24 49 8 23 80 60 57 61 58 Vacancies OAS/CCB Techs A-E Project Support 56 40

20 26 30 2000 2001 29 23 0 2002 2003 Fiscal Year 38 SUMMARY OF LEARNING AND GROWTH DATA Approximately one award per employee Four days of sick leave per employee One EEO complaint, two ER and five ADR cases out of 111 employees Employee turnover low at 3% per OQM Data Specific areas are experiencing high vacancy DS1, DS5&DS6 FY 01 = 22%/FY02= 23%/FY03 = 31% 39

Service Group Block Diagram 40 Analysis of Readiness & Conclusions Skill Requirements Good mix of skills and abilities Manpower Projections current manpower levels and projected levels indicate an immediate short fall of approximately 30% Training Programs being developed at DS Levels to address competencies Tools Required comprehensive management information system that cross Discrete Services Areas GAP Analysis- Need to address our ability to provide services at reduced manpower level. -Contract Assistance -More efficient organization 41 Analysis of Readiness & Conclusions RESULTS OF NO ACTION WILL BE - increased inefficiency in service delivery - reduced quality of services - reduced quantity of services - elimination of certain services provided 42

Financial Perspective o UNIT COST o UNIQUE FINANCIAL MEASURES o ASSET UTILIZATION 43 Unit Cost Measures 44 Unit Cost Measures Office of Research Services Unit Cost Report Unit of Output Measure Building & Space Acquire and dispose of real estate Acquire and dispose of real estate Maintain real property records Negotiate licenses, permits and easements Develop design standards Develop design standards Develop and update the NIH Design Policy and Guidelines Develop design specifications for projects Provide A/E consultation and technical advice Manage Real Property Projects Manage Real Property Projects Manage the planning of capital facilities Manage the planning of major leased facilities

Manage the design and construction of capital facilities Manage the build out process for leased facilities Manage the lease acquisition process for major leased facilities Establish and administer acquisition vehicles for A/E & constr. Review extramural construction projects Review extramural construction projects Perform master and facilities planning Perform master and facilities planning Perform environmental planning Formulate 5yr FCIP Formulate annual Building and Space Program Master plan NIH facilities Perform historic preservation review Plan and design campus infrastructure Develop Strategic Facilities Plan Coordinates community and agency planning input Provide construction site coordination Provide space planning to support IC programs Develop facility options to support IC programs Manage space justification document process Manage NIH Director's Reserve space Prepare documentation of space requirements based on IC needs actions actions actions standards sections updated + waivers sections developed or updated hours projects projects $ value of construction $ value of build-outs

lease actions actions document reviews projects Reports hours hours supporting OFP projects requiring review Campus and NIHAC RSF census hours of coordination request # of request SJDs Sq Ft for Dir Res Requests FY 2002 Budget Number of Unit Cost Units of (Budget $ / Budget $ Output No. of Units) 14,230,450.29 610,367.77 480,007.43 100,595.48 29,764.87 1,727,742.39 1,110,170.39 370,406.82 247,165.18

9,484,209.70 1,488,497.34 823,728.50 4,606,541.94 44,376.37 331,935.81 2,189,129.73 514,039.00 514,039.00 1,558,234.83 221,026.25 44,037.93 146,959.23 813,311.78 63,795.14 8,159.14 98,393.88 162,551.48 335,856.61 164,278.97 86,903.14 84,674.50 609 $ 794 $ 794 $ 788.19 126.69 37.49 160 15 1,560

$ $ 6,938.56 $ 24,693.79 $ 158.44 20 63 235,000,000 40,000,000 609 794 $ $ 74,424.87 $ 13,075.06 $ 0.02 $ 0.00 $ 545.05 $ 2,757.09 128 $ 575,280 3 1,560 1,560 15 13,522,290 28,256 630 165 82,620

165 4,015.93 $ $ $ 14,679.31 $ 94.20 $ 521.35 $ 4,253.01 $ 0.00 $ 3.48 $ 258.02 $ $ $ $ $ 995.63 1.05 513.18 FY2003 Orig Forecast Number of Unit Cost Units of (Budget $ / Budget $ Output

No. of Units) 14,536,140.37 417,103.33 282,136.47 105,617.53 29,349.33 1,644,882.65 1,001,696.67 386,846.84 256,339.15 9,504,380.13 1,421,019.92 762,917.49 4,798,924.98 65,779.12 408,560.40 2,047,178.23 534,598.23 534,598.23 2,086,505.84 206,726.09 39,683.71 133,501.54 771,640.44 56,936.14 7,092.78 723,045.42 147,879.73 348,670.19 196,393.64 78,475.76 73,800.79 412 $ 794 $

794 $ 684.80 133.02 36.96 160 15 1,560 $ $ 6,260.60 $ 25,789.79 $ 164.32 24 64 262,000,000 42,000,000 412 794 $ $ 59,209.16 $ 11,920.59 $ 0.02 $ 0.00 $ 991.65 $ 2,578.31 147 $

586,786 3 1,560 1,560 15 13,522,290 28,821 630 168 84,272 168 3,636.72 $ $ $ 13,227.90 $ 85.58 $ 494.64 $ 3,795.74 $ 0.00 $ 25.09 $ 234.73 $ $ $ $ $ 1,169.01

0.93 439.29 45 Unique Financial Measures DS5 Soft Cost as % of Construction DS5 Construction Square Foot Costs DS6 Construction Cost per Square Foot 46 How much do we charge to put $1 of construction in place? Soft Cost Soft cost is the cost of the professional services on a project, including fee-for-service, construction quality management (CQM), costs of studies, and design. Louis Stokes Research Center, Building 50 Construction cost: $100,402,427 Soft costs: $15,041,343 Soft cost/Dollar construction: $.15

Bumpers Vaccine Research Center, Building 40 Construction cost: $29,119,328 Soft costs: $3,226,048 Soft cost/Dollar construction: $.11 East Day Care Center, Building 64 Construction cost: $3800,000 Soft costs: $700,000 Soft cost/Dollar construction: $.18 Comparative figures from government and private industry* Navy, Soft cost/Dollar construction: $11.8 (Was $.16 before soft costs were subsidized) GSA, Soft cost/Dollar construction: $18.4 (Includes high-end AE/CM, plus average 6% FFS) Private Industry, $.16 (high-end AE/CM)

*These figures were provided by Logistics Management, Inc. High-end figures were used to reflect that NIH facilities are, almost without exception, high-end projects that include laboratory and animal care space rather than just office or living space. 47 Unit Cost Construction Re DS5 (Capital Facilities): Following are the costs/sq.ft. of three non-NIH facilities based on design and construction cost of the facility and gross square footage. In addition, Ive included information about the type of facility for comparison purposes: M.D. Anderson Cancer Center Research Building, Houston, Texas. This building has 230,400 gross square feet of space that includes medical laboratories, veterinary medicine labs, and surgical facilities. It contains no vivarium (an expensive feature). Cost per square foot was $342. Johns Hopkins Blaustein Cancer Research Building, Baltimore, Maryland. This 242,000 square foot research facility houses labs, offices, and support spaces including a vivarium.

Cost per square foot was $297. Walter Reed Naval Research Center Biomedical Research Facility, Bethesda, Maryland. This 474,000 square foot facility houses lab and office space, a library, and an animal facility. Cost per square foot was $344. 48 The Louis Stokes Laboratories, Building 50. This building is 294,530 square feet and includes lab space, a vivarium, and some conference space. It houses a BL3 lab and an electron microscope suite. It was constructed for energy efficiency that resulted in higher-than-average cost initially in exchange for a 40% reduction in energy used over the lifetime of the building. Cost per square foot was $368. Bumpers Vaccine Research Center, Building 40. The VRC has 84,896 square feet of space including labs, a vivarium, a cyber-caf with two plasma screens, the first uniform security system adopted by NIH, and a state-of-the-art video teleconferencing center with links to multiple conference rooms. Cost per square foot was $400. East Day Care, Building 64. This Child Care Center has 21,000 square feet of space with a number of cost factors not in any of the other NIH or non-NIH buildings listed here. Because the building was constructed in a wooded area of the campus, there were no existing utilities to tap into. Because it is a facility for children, special shatter-proof glass had to be used, and a security fence and extensive landscaping (including a playground) were included in construction costs. Cost per square foot was $223. Average cost per square foot of non-NIH facilities listed: $328 Average cost per square foot of NIH facilities listed: $330 Average cost per square foot of NIH research facilities listed (not Day Care): $384 (This last figure indicates that NIH research facilities cost ??% more to design and build than similar facilities in the private sector.) According to a survey, Impact of Federal Government Contracting Requirements on Design and Construction Costs, conducted by Logistics Management, Inc. and published in December 2000, Participants were unanimous in their belief that complying with federal government contracting requirements increases both their design costs and construction costs. . . . design costs are about 6 percent higher on federal government contracts than they are on private-sector contracts and . . . construction costs are about 9 percent higher. One contractor interviewed for the report stated, We usually increase cost estimates by 25 to 50 percent for federal construction projects, depending on the agency.

49 Cost per square foot data for DS6: Re DS6 (Leased Facilities): Because DCAB has only recently taken over renovation and alteration of leased facilities for NIH, we do not have data for completed projects. However, to produce a very rough figure for comparison purposes, we have added the gross square footage of projects currently active (995,833 square feet), divided that number by the projected cost of these projects ($186,171,000) and reached a cost per square foot of $187. 50 ASSET UTILIZATION 51 Asset Utilization Measures Program Managers Time on Project Management Time on

Non-Mission Special Services Time Average Ideal 12.5% 73.3% 27% 63% Asset utilization rate: 95.33 14.2% 10% Project Officers Average Ideal 68.2% 21%

60% 30% Asset utilization rate: 99.11 11% 10% 52 Financial Measures Summary Our unit costs vary by Discrete Service - Track the unit costs to measure change - Develop a unit of product for the Service Group Unique Financial Measures - These measures show competitive cost Asset Utilization Currently at a high level of utilization 53 Conclusions and Recommendations We do not know enough information about our customers to be able to quantify which services they most highly value. - Implement the customer scorecard for the Service Group and address our services Definition of Data, Availability of Data, interpretation of Data is fragmented and ill defined. -Need to provide a mechanism infrastructure/ process/organization to provide information 54 Conclusions and Recommendations-contd

Planning is responding to external requirements which cause potential backlog in procurement and implementation area. - Develop process for planning to incorporate work load analysis at the early stages of their process The Management information infrastructure consists of localized, independent systems which hamper the ability to work as one ORS. - ORS should develop a system to track, help manage, and provide information on projects from planning to closeout 55 Conclusions and Recommendations-contd The Service Group needs to increase communication between the Discrete Service Areas. - Schedule Quarterly Forecast Meetings - Schedule annual Planning Meetings - Team more for Marketing Synergy 56 Appendices 57 Appendices

Include the following: Customer satisfaction Survey Process maps Learning and Growth Assessment Unit cost graphs DCAB Training Program 58 Customer Satisfaction Survey Survey combined to ASAs: Perform Master and Facilities Planning Provide Space Planning to Support IC Programs Arrayed their 12 discrete services on a continuum Long Range Planning (10-20 year planning horizon Mid-range Planning (5-10 year planning horizon Short-range Planning (1-5 year planning horizon) Customers were asked to rate satisfaction on a scale of 110, (unsatisfactory to outstanding) with respect to

Quality Timeliness Responsiveness 59 Customer Survey Response Rate: low at 18% Response Profile: Good cross section of respondents with respect to Location: Bethesda, Local Leased area, Outside area Size: Very large to very small ICs Function: mix of intramural, extramural, both 60 Customer Survey: Short Range Planning Ratings Lowest ratings among the three timeframes:

the point in the continuum where competition among priorities is greatest and most disappointments will occur As NIH implements plans to maintain Directors Reserve and more funds are available to meet more priorities, these rating should improve 61 Process Mapping 62 63 64 n s 65 n s 66 67 o n

s 68 n s 69 o n s 70 o n s 71 FY02 Learning and Growth (L&G) Data for the Annual Self Assessments Service Group 5: Manage Real Property Projects 7 October 2002 Summary Prepared by the Office of Quality Management 72 Methodology All data represent occurrences from Oct 2001 - June 2002

ORS Human Resources (HR) provided data on: Data analyzed covered period between October 1st and end of June to provide time to analyze and present the data Turnover Sick leave Awards HR data stored in NIH databases by Standard Administrative Codes (SACs) Developed cross-reference of ORS Service Groups to SACs Almost all SACs assigned to Service Groups Some Service Groups have identical SACs In this case, two Service Groups will receive same set of data 73 Methodology (cont.) Also obtained data from:

Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) Employee Relations (ER) Number of EEO complaints Number of ER cases Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) ADR cases 74 Interpreting Your Data FY02 is the first time L&G data were collected and analyzed Interpret data in terms of other ASA data

Compare your Service Group relative to the other ORS Service Groups What are all the L&G indicators telling you? In the future your group should compare itself to its own Service Group data over time Customer satisfaction ratings Process measures Financial measures Does the L&G data, when compared to data in other perspectives, show potential relationship (could L&G be contributing to customer satisfaction results)? From reviewing your Service Groups L&G data, what could be done to improve Quality of Work Life (QOWL)? 75 Service Group Turnover Rate Calculated as the number of separations for a Service Group / Population of Service Group Separations defined as:

Retirements (separation codes 3010, 3020, 3022) Resignations (separation codes 3120, 3170) Removals (separation codes 3300) Terminations (separation codes 3520, 3550, 3570) Promotions to new organization (separation codes 7020) Reassignments (separation code 7210) Note that transfers/promotions within ORS Divisions/Offices are not captured by the NIH database 76 Service Group Turnover Rate (cont.) Calculation of Service Group population was needed since number of employees changes over time Population for Service Group was estimated based on average of employee count at three snapshots in time (Nov 2001, Feb 2002, June 2002) 77 Service Group Turnover Rate (Oct 2001 - June 2002) 0.35 0.30

Turnover Rate 0.25 0.20 0.15 0.10 0.05 0.00 12 16 21 30 27 20 42 13 41 3 24 23 7 18 1 2 10 11 17 31 26 25 40 28 37 29 33 39 Service Group Number 5 32 36 38

4 8 9 14 15 19 34 35 43 78 Average Hours of Sick Leave Used Calculated as the total number of sick leave hours used for a Service Group / Population of Service Group 79 Average Hours of Sick Leave Used (Oct 2001 - June 2002) 80 70 60 Average Hours 50 40

30 20 10 0 14 3 9 31 8 17 43 38 36 33 41 12 30 32 28 18 29 21 39 20 16 24 27 40 35 Service Group Number 5 23 42 19 4 34 15 37 25 26 1 2 10 11 13

80 7 Average Number of Awards Received Calculated as the total number of awards received / Population of Service Group Includes both monetary and non-monetary awards Cash awards QSIs Time-off Honorary Customer Service 81 Average Number of Awards Received (Oct 2001 - June 2002) 4.50 4.00 3.50 Average number

3.00 2.50 2.00 1.50 1.00 0.50 0.00 9 43 1 2 10 11 40 42 7 41 12 4 5 28 39 35 32 33 8

15 36 38 34 37 29 17 14 31 16 30 19 18 13 20 21 Service Group Number 3 24 26 25 23 27 82 Average Number of EEO Complaints Calculated the total number of EEO complaints for a Service Group / Population of Service Group 83 Average Number of EEO Complaints (Oct 2001 - June 2002) 0.07 0.06 Average Number 0.05 0.04 0.03 0.02

0.01 0.00 20 7 26 38 36 1 2 3 4 5 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 21 23 25 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 37 39 40 41 42 43 Service Group Number 84 Average Number of ER Cases Calculated the total number of ER cases for a

Service Group / Population of Service Group Case is defined as any contact with ER Office where an action occurs (e.g., Letter is prepared) 85 Average Number of ER Cases 0.30 (Oct 2001 - June 2002) 0.25 Average Number 0.20 0.15 0.10 0.05 0.00 7 23 16 3 31 13 9 20 25 26 17 36 38 37 29 32 39 1 2 4 8 10 11 12 14 15 18 19 21 27 28 30 33 34 35 40 41 42 43 Service Group Number

86 Average Number of ADR Cases Calculated the number of ADR cases for a Service Group / Population of Service Group Case is initiated when person contacts ADR 87 Average Number of ADR Cases (Oct 2001 - June 2002) 0.25 Average Number 0.20 0.15 0.10 0.05 0.00 7 9 30 24 33 34 26 3

23 25 5 32 20 21 31 29 39 28 36 16 38 1 2 4 Service Group Number 8 10 11 12 13 14 15 17 18 19 27 35 37 40 41 42 43 88 Unit Cost Graphs Unit Cost - Manage Real Property Projects $0.0400 $0.0357 $0.0350 Unit Cost ($) $0.0300 $0.0289 $0.0271

$0.0250 $0.0200 $0.0150 $0.0100 $0.0094 $0.0050 $2002 Op 2003 Op Year Capital Projects: Leased Projects: 89 Unit Construction Costs of DCAB Projects per Project Team for FY '01 Recommendations & FY'02 $1,600,000 FY '01 $ per Project $1,200,000 FY '02 $ per Project $ Value of Projects (Bar) $1,400,000 $1,000,000

$800,000 $600,000 $400,000 $200,000 $0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Other Project Team 90

DCAB Comprehensive Training Program Over the last few years, DCAB workload and customer demands have increased while the workforce has declined substantially due to a long-term hiring freeze. Therefore, DCAB staff must do more with less, making it essential that there be a common understanding of the core requirements/responsibilities of Project Management at NIH. A training program will help address this problem by clearly identifying and explaining these core requirements and by creating a common body of information and skills needed to meet the needs of our customers. The program has five components: Required core training will include separate curricula for Project Officers and Program Managers and will focus on providing a survey of requirements, responsibilities, knowledge and skills needed immediately by each group. For Project Officers, the core curriculum will focus upon basic requirements/responsibilities and skills of project management, specifically as they relate to DCAB projects and showing how these are accounted for in the processes and procedures in our Quality System Manual (QSM) and Project Information Network (PIN). This course must be structured to create an awareness of Federal Acquisition Regulations (FAR) requirements at each phase of a project. Program Manager core training will focus on workplace/leadership skills. Program Managers will also take the Project Officer core training. Functional training will follow the core training and provide a more in-depth study of specific subjects covered in the core courses. Specific courses to be offered and the schedule on which they are given will be determined after completion of the core courses and reassessment of the training needs of the staff. Training in Use of Management Systems (PIN and IPS). This component will provide badly needed handson training. A manual for PIN is currently being developed as a reference for those who take the course. This will be required training for all new hires. Because the Interconnected Project Schedule (IPS) is an essential tool for

managing the massive number of interconnected moves that will occur in FY04 (1.4 million square feet), all Program Managers and Project Officers will be trained in using Microsoft Project 2002 (on which the IPS is based), as well as the IPS itself. A Series of Informal Mini-Lessons to Keep Project Officers Up-to-Date on Essential Processes and Procedures. These mini-lessons will be conducted by peer instructors either within DCAB or in some appropriate other branch of DES. Curriculum will include instruction in a specific process (such as radiography) or procedure with which Project Officers must be familiar but which they may not encounter frequently. Instruction will take place during team staff meetings and will be video-recorded for showing to new hires, those who miss the first instruction, and those who need refreshers. A short test will follow each lesson to serve as reinforcement of concepts and to provide a record of who has taken the lesson. In addition, a single-sheet handout will summarize the main points, and these sheets will be kept in a binder for future reference. Orientation. A program that focuses on helping newly-hired Project Officers become immediately effective on the job. Newly hired Project Officers will learn the mission of NIH as well as the organization and roles of ORS/DES/DCAB; the chains of command within NIH; resources available to Project Officers; stakeholders and how to contact them; management systems used on the job; and the required core of project management courses. 91

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