2016 Boy Scout Rank Requirements - Patriots' Path Council

2016 Boy Scout Rank Requirements - Patriots' Path Council

2016 BOY SCOUT RANK REQUIREMENTS OVERVIEW OF CHANGES Changes take effect January 1, 2016 Scout becomes a Rank. Increased emphasis on service. Service is now a requirement for Tenderfoot thru Eagle. Increased emphasis on physical fitness. New Tenderfoot thru First Class requirements encourage Scouts to develop life long physical fitness activity habits. Increased emphasis on camping and camping skills. Increased number of nights camping for Second Class and First Class. Duty to God is incorporated into requirement to show Scout Spirit. Realignment of some Tenderfoot thru First Class requirements. Some navigation requirements allow use of electronic GPS. OVERVIEW OF CHANGES

The following slides show: New Requirements for each Rank Changes or additions to existing Requirements in BOLD (Requirements moved within Tenderfoot, Second Class & First Class) Considerations regarding these changes: What new things must I (the SM) be aware of? What new things must the Scouts be aware of? What changes are needed in my Troops program? SCOUT RANK 1. Scouts 1a. Repeat from memory the Scout Oath, Scout Law, Scout motto, and Scout slogan. In your own words, explain their meaning. Explain what Scout spirit is. Describe some ways you have shown Scout spirit by practicing the Scout Oath, Scout Law, Scout motto, and Scout slogan. 1b. 1c.

Demonstrate the Boy Scout sign, salute, and handshake. Explain when they should be used. 1d. Describe the First Class Scout badge and tell what each part stands for. Explain the significance of the First Class Scout badge. 1e. Repeat from memory the Outdoor Code. In your own words, explain what the Outdoor Code means to you. 1f. Repeat from memory the Pledge of Allegiance. In your own words, explain its meaning. 2. After attending at least one Boy Scout troop meeting, do the following: 2a. Describe how the Scouts in the troop provide its leadership. 2b. Describe the four steps of Boy Scout advancement. 2c. Describe the Boy Scout ranks and how they are earned.2d. Describe what merit badges are and how they are earned. 3. Patrol 3a. Explain the patrol method. Describe the types of patrols that are used in your troop.

3b. Become familiar with your patrol name, emblem, flag, and yell. Explain how these items create patrol spirit. 4. Knots & ropes 4a. Show how to tie a square knot, two half-hitches, and a taut-line hitch. Explain how each knot is used. 4b. Show the proper care of a rope by learning how to whip and fuse the ends of different kinds of rope. 5. Demonstrate your knowledge of pocket knife safety. 6. With your parent or guardian, complete the exercises in the pamphlet How to Protect Your Children from Child Abuse: A Parents Guide and earn the Cyber Chip Award for your grade. 7. Since joining the troop and while working on Scout rank, participate in a Scoutmaster conference TENDERFOOT 1c. Tell how you practiced the Outdoor Code on a campout or outing. 2b. While on a campout, demonstrate an appropriate method of safely cleaning items used to prepare, serve, and eat a meal. 3a. Demonstrate a practical use of the square knot. 3b. Demonstrate a practical use of two half-hitches. 3c. Demonstrate a practical use of the taut-line hitch. 3d. Demonstrate proper care, sharpening, and use of the knife, saw, and ax. Describe when each should be used. (Previously 2nd Class) 4c. Tell what you can do while on a campout or other outdoor activity to prevent or reduce the

occurrence of injuries or exposure listed in Tenderfoot requirements 4a and 4b. (First Aid requirement) 4d. Assemble a personal first-aid kit to carry with you on future campouts and hikes. Tell how each item in the kit would be used. (Previously 2nd Class) TENDERFOOT 6a. Record your best in the following tests: Push ups, sit ups, back-saver sit-and-reach and 1 mile walk/run. (First three are best in 60 seconds.) 6b. Develop and describe a plan for improvement in each of the activities listed in requirement 6a. Keep track of your activity for at least 30 days 6c. Show improvement (of any degree) in each activity listed in Tenderfoot requirement 6a after practicing for 30 days. 7b. Participate in a total of one hour of service in one or more service projects approved by your Scoutmaster. Explain how your service to others relates to the Scout slogan and Scout motto 8. Describe the steps in Scoutings Teaching EDGE method. Use the Teaching EDGE method to

teach another person how to tie the square knot. 9. Demonstrate Scout spirit by living the Scout Oath and Scout Law. Tell how you have done your duty to God and how you have lived four different points of the Scout Law in your everyday life. 10. While working toward the Second Class rank, and after completing Scout rank requirement 7, participate in a Scoutmaster conference. SECOND CLASS 1a. Since joining, participate in five separate troop/patrol activities, three of which include overnight camping. These five activities do not include troop or patrol meetings. On at least two of the three campouts, spend the night in a tent that you pitch or other structure that you help erect (such as a lean-to, snow cave, or tepee). 1b. Explain the seven principles of Leave No Trace and tell how you practiced them on a campout or outing. This outing must be different from the one used for "Tenderfoot requirement 1c".

(Previously 1st Class) 1c. On one of these campouts, select a location for your patrol site and recommend it to your patrol leader, senior patrol leader, or troop guide. Explain what factors you should consider when choosing a patrol site and where to pitch a tent. 2a. Explain when it is appropriate to use a fire for cooking or other purposes and when it would not be appropriate to do so. 2d. Explain when it is appropriate to use a lightweight stove and when it is appropriate to use a propane stove. Set up a lightweight stove or propane stove. Light the stove, unless prohibited by local fire restrictions. Describe the safety procedures for using these types of stoves 2f. Demonstrate tying the sheet bend knot. Describe a situation in which you would use this knot. 2g. Demonstrate tying the bowline knot. Describe a situation in which you would use this knot. (Previously 1st Class) SECOND CLASS 3a. Demonstrate how a compass works and how to orient a map. Use a map to point out and tell

the meaning of five map symbols. 3c. Describe some hazards or injuries that you might encounter on your hike (3b) and what you can do to help prevent them. 3d. Demonstrate how to find directions during the day and at night without using a compass or an electronic device. (Previously 1st Class) 4. Identify or show evidence of at least 10 kinds of wild animals (such as birds, mammals, reptiles, fish, or mollusks) found in your local area or camping location. You may show evidence by tracks, signs, or photographs you have taken. 6c. Tell what you can do while on a campout or hike to prevent or reduce the occurrence of the injuries listed in Second Class requirements 6a and 6b. 6d. Explain what to do in case of accidents that require emergency response in the home and backcountry. Explain what constitutes an emergency and what information you will need to provide to a responder. 6e. Tell how you should respond if you come upon the scene of a vehicular accident.

SECOND CLASS 7a. After completing Tenderfoot requirement 6c, be physically active at least 30 minutes each day for five days a week for four weeks. Keep track of your activities. 7b. Share your challenges and successes in completing Second Class requirement 7a. Set a goal for continuing to include physical activity as part of your daily life and develop a plan for doing so. 7c. Participate in a school, community, or troop program on the dangers of using drugs, alcohol, and tobacco and other practices that could be harmful to your health. Discuss your participation in the program with your family, and explain the dangers of substance addictions. Report to your Scoutmaster or other adult leader in your troop about which parts of the Scout Oath and Scout Law relate to what you learned. 8c. With your parents or guardian, decide on an amount of money that you would like to earn, based on the cost of a specific item you would like to purchase. Develop a written plan to earn the amount agreed upon and follow that plan; it is acceptable to make changes to your plan along the way. Discuss any changes made to your original plan and whether you met your goal. 8d. At a minimum of three locations, compare the cost of the item for which you are saving to determine the best place to purchase it. After completing Second Class requirement 8c, decide if you

will use the amount that you earned as originally intended, save all or part of it, or use it for another purpose. 8e. Participate in two hours of service through one or more service projects approved by your Scoutmaster. Tell how your service to others relates to the Scout Oath. SECOND CLASS 9b. Describe bullying; tell what the appropriate response is to someone who is bullying you or another person. (Previously Tenderfoot) 10. Demonstrate Scout spirit by living the Scout Oath and Scout Law. Tell how you have done your duty to God and how you have lived four different points of the Scout Law (not to include those used for Tenderfoot requirement 9) in your everyday life. 11. While working toward the Second Class rank, and after completing Tenderfoot requirement 10, participate in a Scoutmaster conference. FIRST CLASS

1a. Since joining, participate in 10 separate troop/patrol activities, six of which include overnight camping. These 10 activities do not include troop or patrol meetings. On at least five of the six campouts, spend the night in a tent that you pitch or other structure that you help erect (such as a lean-to, snow cave, or tepee). 1b. Explain each of the principles of Tread Lightly! and tell how you practiced them on a campout or outing. This outing must be different from the ones used for Tenderfoot requirement 1c and Second Class requirement 1b. 2a. Help plan a menu for one of the above campouts that includes at least one breakfast, one lunch, and one dinner, and that requires cooking at least two of the meals. Tell how the menu includes the foods from MyPlate or the current USDA nutritional model and how it meets nutritional needs for the planned activity or campout. 2b. Using the menu planned in First Class requirement 2a, make a list showing a budget and the food amounts needed to feed three or more boys. Secure the ingredients. 2c. Show which pans, utensils, and other gear will be needed to cook and serve these meals. 4b. Demonstrate how to use a handheld GPS unit, GPS app on a smartphone, or other electronic

navigation system. Use GPS to find your current location, a destination of your choice, and the route you will take to get there. Follow that route to arrive at your destination. FIRST CLASS 5a. Identify or show evidence of at least 10 kinds of native plants found in your local area or campsite location. You may show evidence by identifying fallen leaves or fallen fruit that you find in the field, or as part of a collection you have made, or by photographs you have taken. 5b. Identify two ways to obtain a weather forecast for an upcoming activity. Explain why weather forecasts are important when planning for an event. 5c. Describe at least three natural indicators of impending hazardous weather, the potential dangerous events that might result from such weather conditions, and the appropriate actions to take. 5d. Describe extreme weather conditions you might encounter in the outdoors in your local geographic area. Discuss how you would determine ahead of time the potential risk of these types of weather dangers, alternative planning considerations to avoid such risks, and how you would prepare for and respond to those weather conditions.

6c. Identify the basic parts of a canoe, kayak, or other boat. Identify the parts of a paddle or an oar.6d. Describe proper body positioning in a watercraft, depending on the type and size of the vessel. Explain the importance of proper body position in the boat. 6d. Describe proper body positioning in a watercraft, depending on the type and size of the vessel. Explain the importance of proper body position in the boat. FIRST CLASS 7d. Tell what utility services exist in your home or meeting place. Describe potential hazards associated with these utilities and tell how to respond in emergency situations. 7e. Develop an emergency action plan for your home that includes what to do in case of fire, storm, power outage, and water outage.7f. Explain how to obtain potable water in an emergency. 7f. Explain how to obtain potable water in an emergency. 8a. After completing Second Class requirement 7a, be physically active at least 30 minutes each day for five days a week for four weeks. Keep track of your activities.

8b. Share your challenges and successes in completing First Class requirement 8a. Set a goal for continuing to include physical activity as part of your daily life. 9b. Investigate an environmental issue affecting your community. Share what you learned about that issue with your patrol or troop. Tell what, if anything, could be done by you or your community to address the concern. 9c. On a Scouting or family outing, take note of the trash and garbage you produce. Before your next similar outing, decide how you can reduce, recycle, or repurpose what you take on that outing, and then put those plans into action. Compare your results. FIRST CLASS 9d. Participate in three hours of service through one or more service projects approved by your Scoutmaster. The project(s) must not be the same service project(s) used for Tenderfoot requirement 7b and Second Class requirement 8e. Explain how your service to others relates to the Scout Law.

11. Demonstrate Scout spirit by living the Scout Oath and Scout Law. Tell how you have done your duty to God and how you have lived four different points of the Scout Law (different from those points used for previous ranks) in your everyday life. 12. While working toward the First Class rank, and after completing Second Class requirement 11, participate in a Scoutmaster conference. STAR 2. As a First Class Scout, demonstrate Scout spirit by living the Scout Oath and Scout Law. Tell how you have done your duty to God and how you have lived the Scout Oath and Scout Law in your everyday life. 5. While a First Class Scout, serve actively in your troop for four months in one or more of the following positions of responsibility (or carry out a Scoutmaster approved leadership project to help the troop):Boy Scout troop. Patrol leader, assistant senior patrol leader, senior patrol leader, troop guide, Order of the Arrow troop representative, den chief, scribe, librarian, historian, quartermaster, bugler, junior assistant Scoutmaster, chaplain aide, instructor, webmaster, or outdoor ethics guide.

(Removed Venture Patrol Leader now referred to as Patrol Leader) 6. With your parent or guardian, complete the exercises in the pamphlet How to Protect Your Children from Child Abuse: A Parents Guide and earn the Cyber Chip Award for your grade. LIFE 2. As a Star Scout, demonstrate Scout spirit by living the Scout Oath and Scout Law. Tell how you have done your duty to God and how you have lived the Scout Oath and Scout Law in your everyday life. 4. While a Star Scout, participate in six hours of service through one or more service projects approved by your Scoutmaster. At least three hours of this service must be conservationrelated. 5. While a Star Scout, serve actively in your troop for four months in one or more of the following positions of responsibility (or carry out a Scoutmaster approved leadership project to help the troop): Patrol leader, assistant senior patrol leader, senior patrol leader, troop guide, Order of the Arrow troop representative, den chief, scribe, librarian, historian, quartermaster, bugler, junior

assistant Scoutmaster, chaplain aide, instructor, webmaster, or outdoor ethics guide. (Removed Venture Patrol Leader now referred to as Patrol Leader) LIFE 6. While a Star Scout, use the Teaching EDGE method to teach another Scout (preferably younger than you) the skills from ONE of the following choices, so that he is prepared to pass those requirements to his Scoutmasters satisfaction. a. Tenderfoot 4a and 4b (first aid) b. Second Class 2b, 2c, and 2d (cooking/tools ) c. Second Class 3a and 3d (navigation) d. First Class 3a, 3b, 3c, and 3d (tools) e. First Class 4a and 4b (navigation) f. Second Class 6a and 6b (first aid) g. First Class 7a and 7b (first aid) h. Three requirements from one of the required Eagle merit badges, as approved by your Scoutmaster The Scout and Scoutmaster should agree beforehand on what is taught, and on the Scout to whom it is taught. Completing the requirement depends on the learning Scout demonstrating the learned skills to the satisfaction of the Scoutmaster.

EAGLE 2. As a Life Scout, demonstrate Scout spirit by living the Scout Oath and Scout Law. Tell how you have done your duty to God and how you have lived the Scout Oath and Scout Law in your everyday life, and how your understanding of the Scout Oath and Scout Law will guide your life in the future. List on your Eagle Scout Rank Application the names of individuals who know you personally and would be willing to provide a recommendation on your behalf, including parents/guardians, religious (if not affiliated with an organized religion, then the parent or guardian provides this reference), educational, employer (if employed), and two other references. 4. While a Life Scout, serve actively in your troop for six months in one or more of the following positions of responsibility: Patrol leader, assistant senior patrol leader, senior patrol leader, troop guide, Order of the Arrow troop representative, den chief, scribe, librarian, historian, quartermaster, junior assistant Scoutmaster, chaplain aide, instructor, webmaster, or outdoor ethics guide. (Bugler is not approved for the Eagle Rank. Removes Leave No Trace trainer.) TRANSITION TIMING Beginning work in the new requirements will be determined by

the Scouts joining date or current rank as of January 1, 2016. For 2016: Boys joining on or after Jan. 1, 2016 MUST use the new requirements. Boys who have joined prior to Jan. 1, 2016: Who are working on the Scout badge MAY continue to work on the existing requirements, but MUST convert to the new requirements upon completion of the Scout badge. Who are working on Tenderfoot through First Class MAY continue to work on the existing requirements, but MUST convert to the new requirements upon attaining First Class. Who have completed First Class MAY complete the rank they are currently working on in the existing requirements, but then MUST convert to the new requirements for subsequent ranks. For 2017: All Scouts MUST use the new requirements regardless of rank.

FREQUENTLY ASKED ?? Go to http://www.scouting.org/filestore/pdf/2016BoyScoutrequirementsFAQs.pdf Q. Is there a definitive deadline after which ranks cannot be earned using the current requirements? A. Yes. That deadline is Dec. 31, 2016. That is the last day to sign off requirements using the old requirements. Q. Suppose a youth is in the middle of a rank on Dec. 31, 2016, and has to finish that rank using the new requirements. Will he need to start over and repeat all of the requirements for that rank? A. No, not allonly new requirements and any new elements of requirements. If the wording of a completed rank requirement has not changed and that requirement was signed off on or prior to Dec. 31, 2016, the approval should be transferred to the corresponding new requirements. For Tenderfoot through First Class ranks, this may include approvals that were previously listed in a different rank. When the rank in progress has new requirements (or new elements of requirements) that were not in a previously completed rank under the current (2015) requirements, those new requirements or elements will need to be completed in 2017 and beyond. FREQUENTLY ASKED ?? Go to http://www.scouting.org/filestore/pdf/2016BoyScoutrequirementsFAQs.pdf

Q. Will a new handbook be released for use with the new requirements? A. Yes, the 13th edition of the Boy Scout Handbook, which includes the new requirements, will be available in January 2016. Q. Will every Scout need to acquire a new handbook in order to have requirements signed off? A. No. A Scout may continue to use his existing handbook as a reference and resource. However, he should also have a list of the new requirements for the purpose of sign-offs. This will be available for downloading from www.scouting.org. It should be noted that there will be other content updates beyond requirement changes in the new Boy Scout Handbook, which may make the purchase of a new handbook desirable for many BSA members. FREQUENTLY ASKED ?? Go to http://www.scouting.org/filestore/pdf/2016BoyScoutrequirementsFAQs.pdf Service Q. Is there a greater emphasis on service in the new requirements? A. Yes. In keeping with the Scout Oath and helping other people at all times, a service aspect is now a requirement for each rank except the Scout rankone hour for Tenderfoot, two hours for Second Class, and three hours for First Class. The total hours for Star and Life remain the same, at six hours each. Note that half of the six hours for Life rank must be conservation-related; this reflects an increased emphasis on important matters like the outdoors and stewardship of Earth.

Scout Spirit Q. A new element of Scout spirit (Tell how you have done your duty to God ), is alongside the elements of living the Scout Oath and Scout Law in the new requirements. Does this mean troop leaders need to examine and evaluate a Scouts duty to God, and then determine whether it is sufficient by some standard? A. No, not at all. The troop leader is there to listen to the Scout tell about how he believes he has done his duty (the Scouts duty) that is the requirement. The idea is for the Scout to have a self-reflection about belief and reverence. The requirement does not indicate that a discussion or a two-way conversation should take place. For the purpose of the requirement, the boy is simply to tell his leader how he believes he has done his duty to God as defined by himself and his family. Nothing more is required. The telling might be a very brief statement, depending on the Scout and the familys beliefs and on where the Scout is in his development of understanding of such matters, which will evolve as the Scout matures. FREQUENTLY ASKED ?? Go to http://www.scouting.org/filestore/pdf/2016BoyScoutrequirementsFAQs.pdf Scout Rank Q: Will it be difficult for boys new to Scouting to memorize the Scout Oath, Scout Law, and the Outdoor Code for their first rank? A: Memorization could be challenging for some youth, but with weekly repetition and group activities within the patrol to support learning, a new Scout can pick it up quickly. One can expect the Scout rank

to take longer to earn than the joining badge. However, these requirements are not much different from the old requirements where boys were expected to memorize the Scout Oath and Scout Law for their first rank, Tenderfoot. Repeating the Outdoor Code from memory is new, but this was added due to an increased emphasis on the outdoors and camping built into the rank requirements. Q: Not every troop uses patrol flags or yells, so why are there patrol method requirements? A: The patrol method is the basic building block of Boy Scouting. These requirements are intended to help boys transition from an adult-led Cub Scout program and to help all Boy Scouts and troops put more power into their patrols. So if your troop doesnt use the patrol method or use it to the fullest, these requirements could help foster a more youth-led troop. FOR MORE INFORMATION Email the National Advancement Team [email protected] Email you District Advancement Chair http://advancement.ppbsa.org/committee_roster.htm Email your Council Advancement Vice-Chair [email protected] Subscribe to Advancement News send an email to [email protected] Put 'Subscribe' in the Subject line and in the body of the email put only your:

Email Address, Name, and Council Name

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